Tuesday, December 14, 2010

Re: [MISP] FCP & Compressor

Fritz,

 

I will respond “off the air”.  These are the exact types of topics we will be discussing at the annual NMPA event in late February.  Talking about techniques, technology, and methods to improve and monetize our trade is essential to be sure NM does not end up falling behind.  Notices for the event will go out soon.  Stay tuned!

 

Best,

 

Lance Maurer

CEO

Cinnafilm, Inc.

(O) 505.242.6626   |  (M) 505.463.8891  |  (F) 866.571.9694

Lance@Cinnafilm.com

 

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From: Fritz [mailto:fritz@keyvisionmedia.com]
Sent: Monday, December 13, 2010 8:40 PM
To: 'NM Media Discussion List'; Lance Maurer
Subject: RE: [MISP] FCP & Compressor

 

Lance, could you possibly clarify this? My impression has been that making a “Quicktime Movie” (self contained or not) from the FCP timeline was just an assembly of the parts/edits in the timeline (what Avid Liquid Edition used to call a “fused clip”), which is different from a compressed Quicktime file Using Quicktime Conversion from the same File/Export menu (this has indeed needed compensation for the gamma shift by increasing saturation and black).

 

Because I thought a [not self-contained] Quicktime Movie file was similar to an EDL, I’ve always created that from the timeline, and then sent the “assembled” file to compressor for rendering whatever was needed, from m2v to bluray to iphone files. Various tests showed me this method was notably faster in compressor than directly from the timeline, and compressor also worked in the background allowing me to continue using FCP.  

 

To my eyes, the Quicktime Movie file looks exactly like the original timeline. A compressed Quicktime file absolutely does not. Do you know if that is a correct distinction?

 

Fritz

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: NM Media Discussion List [mailto:MISP-L@unm.edu] On Behalf Of Lance Maurer
Sent: Monday, December 13, 2010 3:47 PM
To: MISP-L@LIST.UNM.EDU
Subject: Re: [MISP] FCP & Compressor

 

Michael,

 

Quicktime is plagued with a number of serious problems too long to go into on this list.  It’s OK for the web and youtube, but is a not a good choice for professional-grade output, its metadata is unreliable and it has a gamma shift to name just a few.  Many of my clients are going away from QT for this and other problems it creates as they ramp up and invest in real file-based workflow solutions.  Apple is aware of these issues and yet will not fix them – probably because FCP is a very small portion of their annual sales. 

 

My advice is to stop using QT or expect many more issues down the line.  Look into Adobe CS5, it really is superior now and handles native H.264, R3D, and others formats right into the timeline and plays back in real time.   Just my 2 cents.  I happen to know the folks who work on it at Adobe and can say they really care about the quality of the images they are producing, their new CS5 is proof.

 

PS – when you screen a movie you may be better off showing a DVD than a compressed HD file off a laptop (also, DVD’s are more reliable).  Bitrates are tricky, try not to ever go under 25 MB/s.  Best advice is to watch them all side by side if in doubt.  Here is a nice blog on the subject of quality in the compressed world: http://www.pagetable.com/?p=484 

 

Good luck.

 

 

Lance Maurer

CEO

Cinnafilm, Inc.

(O) 505.242.6626   |  (M) 505.463.8891  |  (F) 866.571.9694

Lance@Cinnafilm.com

 

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTE:  This e-mail and any attachments are confidential. If you are not the intended recipient, be aware that any disclosure, copying, distribution or use of this e-mail or any attachment is prohibited. If you have received this e-mail in error, please notify us immediately by returning it to the sender and delete this copy from your system. Thank you for your cooperation.

 

From: NM Media Discussion List [mailto:MISP-L@unm.edu] On Behalf Of Michael Turri
Sent: Monday, December 13, 2010 3:31 PM
To: MISP-L@LIST.UNM.EDU
Subject: [MISP] FCP & Compressor

 

***This is a MISP Listserv message. Responses are sent to the list by default.*** ***For more info about MISP and the listserv, scroll to the bottom of the page*** *

Is anyone else out there having this issue with FCP. Whenever I got to export  out of FCP, I use EXPORT USING COMPRESSOR.  I get it all set up and start the process only to have FCP crash during the process. It is happening more often than not lately. I use to be able to at least do a short  export, but today, not so much. So then what I do is just use export using QUICKTIME MOVIE and then take that into Compressor and all works well. It is just an extra step of compression that I was trying to avoid. Thanks for any input. 

Michael Turri
Turri Productions
3805 Calle Pino
Albuquerque, NM 87111
505-350-3295-M

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