Friday, July 31, 2009

Re: [MISP] SIGGRAPH Anyone?

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*

Tue afternoon, Dave Shreiner (author of the OpenGL Redbook) and I are teaching
course on Modern OpenGL. On Wed morning, I'm moderating a panel on "the Future
of Teaching Computer Graphics to Students in Engineering, Science, and
Mathematics". Both are triggered by the recent major changes in the OpenGL
API.

Ed

On Fri, 31 Jul 2009 09:04:35 -0600, Eric Renz-Whitmore wrote
> ***This is a MISP Listserv message. Responses are sent to the list
> by default.*** ***For more info about MISP and the listserv, scroll
> to the bottom of the page*** *
>
> Hey folks...
> I know a few folks who (I think) are going -- Ed Angel, Lance Maurer,
> Teri Farley -- anyone else heading to SIGGRAPH this year?
>
> Are you part of any sessions or otherwise presenting or demoing work?
>
> Eric
>
> --
> The Albuquerque Film Festival is Coming (8/6-9)
> http://www.albuquerquefilmfestival.com
>
> Eric Renz-Whitmore, Program Coordinator
> ARTS Lab
> GC: 505-993-6884
> office: 505-277-2253
> cell: 505-227-1086
> http://artslab.unm.edu
>
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__

Ed Angel

Founding Director, Art, Research, Technology and Science Laboratory (ARTS Lab)
Professor Emeritus of Computer Science

Computer Science Department University of New Mexico
Farris Engineering Center 301F Albuquerque, NM 87131 USA
505-277-6560 (Computer Science) angel@cs.unm.edu
505-277-2186 (ARTS Lab) http://www.cs.unm.edu/~angel
505-277-6927
(fax) http://artslab.unm.edu

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[MISP] SIGGRAPH Anyone?

***This is a MISP Listserv message. Responses are sent to the list by default.*** ***For more info about MISP and the listserv, scroll to the bottom of the page*** *

Hey folks...

I know a few folks who (I think) are going -- Ed Angel, Lance Maurer, Teri Farley -- anyone else heading to SIGGRAPH this year?

Are you part of any sessions or otherwise presenting or demoing work?

Eric

--
The Albuquerque Film Festival is Coming (8/6-9)
http://www.albuquerquefilmfestival.com

Eric Renz-Whitmore, Program Coordinator
ARTS Lab
GC:     505-993-6884
office:  505-277-2253
cell:     505-227-1086
http://artslab.unm.edu
LEAVING THE LIST /LIST INFO: To leave the list, please email us at: artslab@unm.edu For other list info, please visit: http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/web/media-industries-list-info Available in RSS: http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/feed/rss_v2_0_msgs.xml

Thursday, July 30, 2009

Re: [MISP] Ca incentive program

Dave,

I agree. I also lived in SoCal (Fountain Valley) in a previous life when I was in the avionics industry. I was there 8 years and made the trek up the 405 to Long Beach and back every day. Traffic then was nothing like it is now, but it was still bad. I remember that one of the biggest lunch room BS discussions was finding the alternate routes to wherever. We even stopped going back to visit people we knew because things got so crowded in and it just wasn’t the place anymore.

I jumped at the chance to move here after I got to spend a few more years in New Jersey as my “reward” for leaving CA. I retired from Honeywell here and could have moved post-retirement to just about anywhere, but decided to stay.

Sure ABQ is growing, but I think its a sensible growth and the opportunities are growing. That’s exactly where I’m coming from. Lets develop more permanent installations that just can’t be packed up and moved when the show wraps. Its not that long ago that there was a big argument over whether Intel should be given Industrial Revenue Bonds to built that Rio Rancho plant – now one of the world’s premiere facilities of its kind and one where Intel is investing another $1.5B or so for modernization.

I wouldn’t want to see this place become another LA – no way! But that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t compete with our strengths, and I believe technology is one, along with the lifestyle.

John

On 7/30/09 10:29 AM, "David Garcia" <david@HALFLIFEDIGITAL.COM> wrote:

***This is a MISP Listserv message. Responses are sent to the list by default.*** ***For more info about MISP and the listserv, scroll to the bottom of the page*** * I think the local "ambiance" has a lot more to do with personal decisions of people who will staff the infrastructure and facilities that are permanent.  I talk to a large number of guys and gals from LA who say it's just not livable anymore.  As someone who grew up in SoCal and spent a fair amount of time in the Bay area, I think this is one of our major competitive advantages.  

When I came back from San Francisco and started halflife* digital, it was because the quality of life in New Mexico is better.  You can start a business with much less overhead and your employees are not paying $1500/month for a room in a flat.  In California it seems like you have to fight for every morsel and sit in traffic the rest of the time.  

But again, I think this bears more on permanent facilities and industries and less on mobile production.  On productions, you'll spend the whole month on set and not see much of the place anyway.  If your lucky you might see 10,000 waves on your day off.  Now that's a draw.  :)

Dave

David Garcia
DP / Operator
IATSE local 600
-----------------------
creative director
halflife* digital
halflifedigital.com
o.505.265.0665
c.505.203.5208




 

On Jul 30, 2009, at 9:59 AM, Jim Terr wrote:

***This is a MISP Listserv message. Responses are sent to the list by default.*** ***For more info about MISP and the listserv, scroll to the bottom of the page*** *


Serious question: Way back in 1992 when I was doing the LVNM promotional video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VgTrWof9f8s) I was told that one reason some movies came out here was for the ambience, the food, the idea of being in New Mexico, etc. Hence some of the things I included in that video.
 
Is that still true – or was it ever true? Are location decisions made strictly on a strictly pragmatic basis, without regard to any of that?


 


From: NM Media Discussion List [mailto:MISP-L@unm.edu] On Behalf Of Eric Renz-Whitmore
Sent: Thursday, July 30, 2009 9:53 AM
To: MISP-L@LIST.UNM.EDU
Subject: Re: [MISP] Ca incentive program

***This is a MISP Listserv message. Responses are sent to the list by default.*** ***For more info about MISP and the listserv, scroll to the bottom of the page*** *
Someone asked, so I should correct myself, I meant to write Reelz Channel instead of ReelFX (don't know what I was thinking).  
 
But let me expand on that just a bit.  
 
I think it's helpful in many ways to look at what New Mexico is doing with film and media as a business.  While it's not the only or even the best way to look at things, it's particularly useful in trying to address questions the LFC has about our return on investment, and/or in competing with other states (and countries) for projects, jobs and locating business.
 
In competing for film jobs, we have to offer a better package than others, selling not only our incentives, but also the ease of doing business with a very responsive film office, the availability of world class facilities, experienced crews, great light and more. Customer satisfaction is huge, so when shows like Breaking Bad and In Plain Sight choose to stay in New Mexico when the raw numbers might suggest someplace else, that's a great sign.  (Big thanks to Jon, IATSE 480 and others for their efforts to keep these shows sold on NM.)
 
But thinking of companies that have chosen to locate or relocate some of their operations here, I think others outside NM are looking at Albuquerque Studios, Imageworks and Reelz Channel to see whether they succeed.  Finding ways to help them achieve success (in some ways delivering on the promise of NM tech goodness) will be very important in determining whether we as a state can repeat the success of film in other media.
 
And then there's Lance -- and a handful of other folks making a real difference with startups and technologies that New Mexico's investment and economic development communities don't quite know what to do with.  It's harder work to support them; less of a model available to create the conditions where more of them can succeed.  But the value of more local success stories like his is tremendous.
 
Eric
 
 
 
 
On Wed, Jul 29, 2009 at 10:12 PM, Eric Renz-Whitmore <ewhitmore@gmail.com> wrote:
Hey :)

I think you're right in that we haven't been able to fully capitalize on all the tech/science capabilities in New Mexico.  But while the idea of leveraging the work of the national labs (and other very smart places) to help grow film and media has been part of the state's Media Industries Strategic Plan (MISP), the lack of apparent progress feels pretty frustrating.  (Given the number of good people working very hard on commercialization and tech transfer... I think it's a harder task than most of us realize.)

Still, and maybe I'm being optimistic for a moment, it does seem like there's progress in this area:

  • One of the focus areas for NMCAC (the NM Supercomputer) is support of high end digital media
  • Los Alamos and the North Central NM economic development organizations have adopted digital media as one of their focus areas
  • The recent agreement for collaboration between UNM, Sandia Labs and the City of Albuquerque has media as one of its priority areas
  • NMSU's Arrowhead Center has been working to promote commercialization of some forms of digital media in the Las Cruces area
Moreover, there have been successes.  Software and technology for games and VFX have been brought out of the labs, but I think one of our biggest successes was encouraging Sony Pictures Imageworks to open operations here.  I know the presence of Imageworks, Albuquerque Studios and more recently ReelFX has made New Mexico more of a real player, encouraging experienced talent (that we still need) to relocate here.  
    
However, I think sustainable success means we need to find ways for small and mid-sized local companies to deliver some of the tech goodness New Mexico has long promised. And we need those companies to grow so students coming out of ECE or CMI (and many other fine places) have options for satisfying work in New Mexico.

But I think the best near term opportunity for tech is finding ways to build on the success we're already having; to package some of our compute-intensive capabilities with film crews, facilities... and that really good light.

btw...  some of this will be part of the talk at next Saturday's NM Postproduction talk at the Albuquerque Film Festival (8/1 @ 3PM). More info on the events list.

Eric




On Wed, Jul 29, 2009 at 6:10 PM, John Maio <john@johnmaiophotography.com> wrote:
***This is a MISP Listserv message. Responses are sent to the list by default.*** ***For more info about MISP and the listserv, scroll to the bottom of the page*** *
Took the words . . .

One thing we don’t seem to take advantage of – and tout – is our technology base. Eric and the other folks at ARTS Lab are doing groundbreaking work. NM has the fastest computer center in the world. OK, so its at Los Alamos, but what about the resident technology that supports this base? It was once said that the Rio Grande corridor has more PhD's per capita than most anywhere else. (LANL. Sandia, WSMR, NRAO (VLA) ) and the industrial base that supports these labs. I’ve had the good fortune to do a series of portraits for the faculty at UNM’s ECE. The stuff they are working on is right at the cutting edge.

One string that runs through all this is graphics computation, signal processing, and imaging. THESE are the elements of future movies, not so much good natural light and weather. I know we have some good people working in these areas here. Lets hear from them. Lance?




On 7/29/09 5:47 PM, "JANET DAVIDSON" <betbuddy@MSN.COM <http://betbuddy@MSN.COM> > wrote:
***This is a MISP Listserv message. Responses are sent to the list by default.*** ***For more info about MISP and the listserv, scroll to the bottom of the page*** *
Mark, unfortunately those two items actually can go against us. Weather...if you have shot here enough you know that it changes every hour or so. What starts as a snow day ends up sunny and snowless. You have to plan for that. Sets get washed away in the downpours (I've been there.) Lightning puts the crew in danger. Light... beautiful ask any camera person how that affects their lives. Lovely for still photos, interesting for motion pictures. Some enjoy the challenge. When it's we can harness all this it's amazing.

 
So perhaps another mantra is needed...good restaurants?

Janet Davidson
For Giving Productions
betbuddy@msn.com <http://betbuddy@msn.com>
www.ACTjanetdavidson.com <http://www.ACTjanetdavidson.com>
<http://www.actjanetdavidson.com/>
 



 
> Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2009 13:56:03 -0600
> From: mark@unm.edu <http://mark@unm.edu>
> Subject: LEAVING THE LIST /LIST INFO: To leave the list, please email us at: artslab@unm.edu <http://artslab@unm.edu> For other list info, please visit: http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/web/media-industries-list-info Available in RSS:http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/feed/rss_v2_0_msgs.xml

--
John Maio
Photographer

Studio: (505) 296-4653  Cell: (505) 681-8035

Visit our website at http://www.johnmaiophotography.com
Need an Actor's Reel?  http://jmpreels.com

Re: [MISP] Ca incentive program

Spoken like a true Coppola. You are right on point. In our memorial we encouraged a broad term to Small and Independent Film projects. It is important to continue the push to develop a local New Media industry. 


On Jul 30, 2009, at 11:24 AM, Christopher Coppola wrote:

***This is a MISP Listserv message. Responses are sent to the list by default.*** ***For more info about MISP and the listserv, scroll to the bottom of the page*** * There's a reason why DW Griffith left New York to build the film industry in California--every type of location is available to shoot in.  You shouldn't forget that. This will always be the case.  It also takes movie stars to make the bulk of the Big Studio movies which are what all the various states are trying to lure from Hollywood (a mistake in the first place).  If you ask any movie star, I personally know a lot them, they would prefer to stay in California than travel.  If California levels the tax incentive playing field, I guarantee you there will be much less run away production.   In the very beginning, I suggested some of the New Mexico interest free loan should be used in developing new technology, a new media savvy work force and experimenting with multi-tasking, multi-platform interactive content.  Like I always say, when our kids grow up they will be the biggest consumer of entertainment of all time and old style filmmaking is not going to cut it.  Big studios are using 3D blockbusters to keep people in the seats, but that is just a temporary, quick fix.  States like New Mexico are smaller machines than Hollywood, it would be easier to concentrate on this new media, become experts and sell to the whole world, real and cyber.  Why should NM just be a satellite location and work force for Hollywood when it can grow into a major content provider.   New Mexico is the only state I have come to know that has what it takes to do that...sophisticated technology, smart minds and art.  Problem is there is very little vision in state politics and the "good ole' boys" are always out for themselves.

On 7/30/09 9:29 AM, "David Garcia" <david@HALFLIFEDIGITAL.COM> wrote:

***This is a MISP Listserv message. Responses are sent to the list by default.*** ***For more info about MISP and the listserv, scroll to the bottom of the page*** * I think the local "ambiance" has a lot more to do with personal decisions of people who will staff the infrastructure and facilities that are permanent.  I talk to a large number of guys and gals from LA who say it's just not livable anymore.  As someone who grew up in SoCal and spent a fair amount of time in the Bay area, I think this is one of our major competitive advantages.  

When I came back from San Francisco and started halflife* digital, it was because the quality of life in New Mexico is better.  You can start a business with much less overhead and your employees are not paying $1500/month for a room in a flat.  In California it seems like you have to fight for every morsel and sit in traffic the rest of the time.  

But again, I think this bears more on permanent facilities and industries and less on mobile production.  On productions, you'll spend the whole month on set and not see much of the place anyway.  If your lucky you might see 10,000 waves on your day off.  Now that's a draw.  :)

Dave

David Garcia
DP / Operator
IATSE local 600
-----------------------
creative director



--
Christopher Coppola
President/Executive Producer
6565 Sunset Blvd. Suite 416
Los Angeles, CA 90028
323-469-8500
213-321-7941 mobile
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Re: [MISP] Ca incentive program

There’s a reason why DW Griffith left New York to build the film industry in California--every type of location is available to shoot in.  You shouldn’t forget that. This will always be the case.  It also takes movie stars to make the bulk of the Big Studio movies which are what all the various states are trying to lure from Hollywood (a mistake in the first place).  If you ask any movie star, I personally know a lot them, they would prefer to stay in California than travel.  If California levels the tax incentive playing field, I guarantee you there will be much less run away production.   In the very beginning, I suggested some of the New Mexico interest free loan should be used in developing new technology, a new media savvy work force and experimenting with multi-tasking, multi-platform interactive content.  Like I always say, when our kids grow up they will be the biggest consumer of entertainment of all time and old style filmmaking is not going to cut it.  Big studios are using 3D blockbusters to keep people in the seats, but that is just a temporary, quick fix.  States like New Mexico are smaller machines than Hollywood, it would be easier to concentrate on this new media, become experts and sell to the whole world, real and cyber.  Why should NM just be a satellite location and work force for Hollywood when it can grow into a major content provider.   New Mexico is the only state I have come to know that has what it takes to do that...sophisticated technology, smart minds and art.  Problem is there is very little vision in state politics and the “good ole’ boys” are always out for themselves.

On 7/30/09 9:29 AM, "David Garcia" <david@HALFLIFEDIGITAL.COM> wrote:

***This is a MISP Listserv message. Responses are sent to the list by default.*** ***For more info about MISP and the listserv, scroll to the bottom of the page*** * I think the local "ambiance" has a lot more to do with personal decisions of people who will staff the infrastructure and facilities that are permanent.  I talk to a large number of guys and gals from LA who say it's just not livable anymore.  As someone who grew up in SoCal and spent a fair amount of time in the Bay area, I think this is one of our major competitive advantages.  

When I came back from San Francisco and started halflife* digital, it was because the quality of life in New Mexico is better.  You can start a business with much less overhead and your employees are not paying $1500/month for a room in a flat.  In California it seems like you have to fight for every morsel and sit in traffic the rest of the time.  

But again, I think this bears more on permanent facilities and industries and less on mobile production.  On productions, you'll spend the whole month on set and not see much of the place anyway.  If your lucky you might see 10,000 waves on your day off.  Now that's a draw.  :)

Dave

David Garcia
DP / Operator
IATSE local 600
-----------------------
creative director



--
Christopher Coppola
President/Executive Producer
6565 Sunset Blvd. Suite 416
Los Angeles, CA 90028
323-469-8500
213-321-7941 mobile

Re: [MISP] Ca incentive program

I think the local "ambiance" has a lot more to do with personal decisions of people who will staff the infrastructure and facilities that are permanent.  I talk to a large number of guys and gals from LA who say it's just not livable anymore.  As someone who grew up in SoCal and spent a fair amount of time in the Bay area, I think this is one of our major competitive advantages.  

When I came back from San Francisco and started halflife* digital, it was because the quality of life in New Mexico is better.  You can start a business with much less overhead and your employees are not paying $1500/month for a room in a flat.  In California it seems like you have to fight for every morsel and sit in traffic the rest of the time.  

But again, I think this bears more on permanent facilities and industries and less on mobile production.  On productions, you'll spend the whole month on set and not see much of the place anyway.  If your lucky you might see 10,000 waves on your day off.  Now that's a draw.  :)

Dave

David Garcia
DP / Operator
IATSE local 600
-----------------------
creative director
halflife* digital
halflifedigital.com
o.505.265.0665
c.505.203.5208





On Jul 30, 2009, at 9:59 AM, Jim Terr wrote:

***This is a MISP Listserv message. Responses are sent to the list by default.*** ***For more info about MISP and the listserv, scroll to the bottom of the page*** *
 
 
Serious question: Way back in 1992 when I was doing the LVNM promotional video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VgTrWof9f8s) I was told that one reason some movies came out here was for the ambience, the food, the idea of being in New Mexico, etc. Hence some of the things I included in that video.
 
Is that still true – or was it ever true? Are location decisions made strictly on a strictly pragmatic basis, without regard to any of that?
 
 
 

From: NM Media Discussion List [mailto:MISP-L@unm.edu] On Behalf Of Eric Renz-Whitmore
Sent: Thursday, July 30, 2009 9:53 AM
To: MISP-L@LIST.UNM.EDU
Subject: Re: [MISP] Ca incentive program
 
***This is a MISP Listserv message. Responses are sent to the list by default.*** ***For more info about MISP and the listserv, scroll to the bottom of the page*** * 
Someone asked, so I should correct myself, I meant to write Reelz Channel instead of ReelFX (don't know what I was thinking).  
 
But let me expand on that just a bit.  
 
I think it's helpful in many ways to look at what New Mexico is doing with film and media as a business.  While it's not the only or even the best way to look at things, it's particularly useful in trying to address questions the LFC has about our return on investment, and/or in competing with other states (and countries) for projects, jobs and locating business.
 
In competing for film jobs, we have to offer a better package than others, selling not only our incentives, but also the ease of doing business with a very responsive film office, the availability of world class facilities, experienced crews, great light and more. Customer satisfaction is huge, so when shows like Breaking Bad and In Plain Sight choose to stay in New Mexico when the raw numbers might suggest someplace else, that's a great sign.  (Big thanks to Jon, IATSE 480 and others for their efforts to keep these shows sold on NM.)
 
But thinking of companies that have chosen to locate or relocate some of their operations here, I think others outside NM are looking at Albuquerque Studios, Imageworks and Reelz Channel to see whether they succeed.  Finding ways to help them achieve success (in some ways delivering on the promise of NM tech goodness) will be very important in determining whether we as a state can repeat the success of film in other media.
 
And then there's Lance -- and a handful of other folks making a real difference with startups and technologies that New Mexico's investment and economic development communities don't quite know what to do with.  It's harder work to support them; less of a model available to create the conditions where more of them can succeed.  But the value of more local success stories like his is tremendous.
 
Eric
 
 
 
 
On Wed, Jul 29, 2009 at 10:12 PM, Eric Renz-Whitmore <ewhitmore@gmail.com> wrote:
Hey :)

I think you're right in that we haven't been able to fully capitalize on all the tech/science capabilities in New Mexico.  But while the idea of leveraging the work of the national labs (and other very smart places) to help grow film and media has been part of the state's Media Industries Strategic Plan (MISP), the lack of apparent progress feels pretty frustrating.  (Given the number of good people working very hard on commercialization and tech transfer... I think it's a harder task than most of us realize.)

Still, and maybe I'm being optimistic for a moment, it does seem like there's progress in this area:
  • One of the focus areas for NMCAC (the NM Supercomputer) is support of high end digital media
  • Los Alamos and the North Central NM economic development organizations have adopted digital media as one of their focus areas
  • The recent agreement for collaboration between UNM, Sandia Labs and the City of Albuquerque has media as one of its priority areas
  • NMSU's Arrowhead Center has been working to promote commercialization of some forms of digital media in the Las Cruces area
Moreover, there have been successes.  Software and technology for games and VFX have been brought out of the labs, but I think one of our biggest successes was encouraging Sony Pictures Imageworks to open operations here.  I know the presence of Imageworks, Albuquerque Studios and more recently ReelFX has made New Mexico more of a real player, encouraging experienced talent (that we still need) to relocate here.  
    
However, I think sustainable success means we need to find ways for small and mid-sized local companies to deliver some of the tech goodness New Mexico has long promised. And we need those companies to grow so students coming out of ECE or CMI (and many other fine places) have options for satisfying work in New Mexico. 

But I think the best near term opportunity for tech is finding ways to build on the success we're already having; to package some of our compute-intensive capabilities with film crews, facilities... and that really good light.

btw...  some of this will be part of the talk at next Saturday's NM Postproduction talk at the Albuquerque Film Festival (8/1 @ 3PM). More info on the events list.

Eric




On Wed, Jul 29, 2009 at 6:10 PM, John Maio <john@johnmaiophotography.com> wrote:
***This is a MISP Listserv message. Responses are sent to the list by default.*** ***For more info about MISP and the listserv, scroll to the bottom of the page*** *
Took the words . . .

One thing we don't seem to take advantage of – and tout – is our technology base. Eric and the other folks at ARTS Lab are doing groundbreaking work. NM has the fastest computer center in the world. OK, so its at Los Alamos, but what about the resident technology that supports this base? It was once said that the Rio Grande corridor has more PhD's per capita than most anywhere else. (LANL. Sandia, WSMR, NRAO (VLA) ) and the industrial base that supports these labs. I've had the good fortune to do a series of portraits for the faculty at UNM's ECE. The stuff they are working on is right at the cutting edge.

One string that runs through all this is graphics computation, signal processing, and imaging. THESE are the elements of future movies, not so much good natural light and weather. I know we have some good people working in these areas here. Lets hear from them. Lance?




On 7/29/09 5:47 PM, "JANET DAVIDSON" <betbuddy@MSN.COM> wrote:
***This is a MISP Listserv message. Responses are sent to the list by default.*** ***For more info about MISP and the listserv, scroll to the bottom of the page*** *
Mark, unfortunately those two items actually can go against us. Weather...if you have shot here enough you know that it changes every hour or so. What starts as a snow day ends up sunny and snowless. You have to plan for that. Sets get washed away in the downpours (I've been there.) Lightning puts the crew in danger. Light... beautiful ask any camera person how that affects their lives. Lovely for still photos, interesting for motion pictures. Some enjoy the challenge. When it's we can harness all this it's amazing.

 
So perhaps another mantra is needed...good restaurants?

Janet Davidson
For Giving Productions
betbuddy@msn.com
 



 
> Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2009 13:56:03 -0600
> From: mark@unm.edu
> Subject: LEAVING THE LIST /LIST INFO: To leave the list, please email us at: artslab@unm.edu For other list info, please visit: http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/web/media-industries-list-info Available in RSS:http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/feed/rss_v2_0_msgs.xml

-- 
John Maio
Photographer

Studio: (505) 296-4653  Cell: (505) 681-8035

Visit our website at http://www.johnmaiophotography.com
Need an Actor's Reel?  http://jmpreels.com
LEAVING THE LIST /LIST INFO: To leave the list, please email us at: artslab@unm.edu For other list info, please visit:http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/web/media-industries-list-info Available in RSS: http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/feed/rss_v2_0_msgs.xml


-- 
The Albuquerque Film Festival is Coming (8/6-9)
http://www.albuquerquefilmfestival.com

Eric Renz-Whitmore, Program Coordinator
ARTS Lab
GC:     505-993-6884
office:  505-277-2253
cell:     505-227-1086
http://artslab.unm.edu



-- 
NMBW's Who's Who in Technology (7/23)
Honoring NM's Top Tech Talents
Info at: http://www.bizjournals.com/albuquerque/event/5321?mp=3

Eric Renz-Whitmore, Program Coordinator
ARTS Lab
GC:     505-993-6884
office:  505-277-2253
cell:     505-227-1086
http://artslab.unm.edu
LEAVING THE LIST /LIST INFO: To leave the list, please email us at: artslab@unm.edu For other list info, please visit:http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/web/media-industries-list-info Available in RSS: http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/feed/rss_v2_0_msgs.xml


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Re: [MISP] Ca incentive program

Jim,

What I’m suggesting that the new genre of “films” like Watchmen, Ironman, and on and on, depend less on the local ambience, food, etc. If your “stage” as an CGI wizard is a 30” monitor and a room full of rendering engines, you probably don’t get to see much of the outside anyway.

The locally produced “I Was A Seventh Dragon Slayer” wrapped a couple of weeks ago and will be in post about a year as CGI characters are created and added to what was captured on the REDs. Hopefully that work can be done here too.

That’s all I’m suggesting.

On 7/30/09 9:59 AM, "Jim Terr" <bluecanyon2@NEWMEXICO.COM> wrote:

***This is a MISP Listserv message. Responses are sent to the list by default.*** ***For more info about MISP and the listserv, scroll to the bottom of the page*** *


Serious question: Way back in 1992 when I was doing the LVNM promotional video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VgTrWof9f8s ) I was told that one reason some movies came out here was for the ambience, the food, the idea of being in New Mexico, etc. Hence some of the things I included in that video.
 
Is that still true – or was it ever true? Are location decisions made strictly on a strictly pragmatic basis, without regard to any of that?


 


From: NM Media Discussion List [mailto:MISP-L@unm.edu] On Behalf Of Eric Renz-Whitmore
Sent: Thursday, July 30, 2009 9:53 AM
To: MISP-L@LIST.UNM.EDU
Subject: Re: [MISP] Ca incentive program

***This is a MISP Listserv message. Responses are sent to the list by default.*** ***For more info about MISP and the listserv, scroll to the bottom of the page*** *
Someone asked, so I should correct myself, I meant to write Reelz Channel instead of ReelFX (don't know what I was thinking).  



But let me expand on that just a bit.  



I think it's helpful in many ways to look at what New Mexico is doing with film and media as a business.  While it's not the only or even the best way to look at things, it's particularly useful in trying to address questions the LFC has about our return on investment, and/or in competing with other states (and countries) for projects, jobs and locating business.



In competing for film jobs, we have to offer a better package than others, selling not only our incentives, but also the ease of doing business with a very responsive film office, the availability of world class facilities, experienced crews, great light and more. Customer satisfaction is huge, so when shows like Breaking Bad and In Plain Sight choose to stay in New Mexico when the raw numbers might suggest someplace else, that's a great sign.  (Big thanks to Jon, IATSE 480 and others for their efforts to keep these shows sold on NM.)



But thinking of companies that have chosen to locate or relocate some of their operations here, I think others outside NM are looking at Albuquerque Studios, Imageworks and Reelz Channel to see whether they succeed.  Finding ways to help them achieve success (in some ways delivering on the promise of NM tech goodness) will be very important in determining whether we as a state can repeat the success of film in other media.



And then there's Lance -- and a handful of other folks making a real difference with startups and technologies that New Mexico's investment and economic development communities don't quite know what to do with.  It's harder work to support them; less of a model available to create the conditions where more of them can succeed.  But the value of more local success stories like his is tremendous.



Eric









On Wed, Jul 29, 2009 at 10:12 PM, Eric Renz-Whitmore <ewhitmore@gmail.com> wrote:
Hey :)

I think you're right in that we haven't been able to fully capitalize on all the tech/science capabilities in New Mexico.  But while the idea of leveraging the work of the national labs (and other very smart places) to help grow film and media has been part of the state's Media Industries Strategic Plan (MISP), the lack of apparent progress feels pretty frustrating.  (Given the number of good people working very hard on commercialization and tech transfer... I think it's a harder task than most of us realize.)

Still, and maybe I'm being optimistic for a moment, it does seem like there's progress in this area:

  • One of the focus areas for NMCAC (the NM Supercomputer) is support of high end digital media
  • Los Alamos and the North Central NM economic development organizations have adopted digital media as one of their focus areas
  • The recent agreement for collaboration between UNM, Sandia Labs and the City of Albuquerque has media as one of its priority areas
  • NMSU's Arrowhead Center has been working to promote commercialization of some forms of digital media in the Las Cruces area
Moreover, there have been successes.  Software and technology for games and VFX have been brought out of the labs, but I think one of our biggest successes was encouraging Sony Pictures Imageworks to open operations here.  I know the presence of Imageworks, Albuquerque Studios and more recently ReelFX has made New Mexico more of a real player, encouraging experienced talent (that we still need) to relocate here.  
    
However, I think sustainable success means we need to find ways for small and mid-sized local companies to deliver some of the tech goodness New Mexico has long promised. And we need those companies to grow so students coming out of ECE or CMI (and many other fine places) have options for satisfying work in New Mexico.

But I think the best near term opportunity for tech is finding ways to build on the success we're already having; to package some of our compute-intensive capabilities with film crews, facilities... and that really good light.

btw...  some of this will be part of the talk at next Saturday's NM Postproduction talk at the Albuquerque Film Festival (8/1 @ 3PM). More info on the events list.

Eric





On Wed, Jul 29, 2009 at 6:10 PM, John Maio <john@johnmaiophotography.com> wrote:

***This is a MISP Listserv message. Responses are sent to the list by default.*** ***For more info about MISP and the listserv, scroll to the bottom of the page*** *

Took the words . . .

One thing we don’t seem to take advantage of – and tout – is our technology base. Eric and the other folks at ARTS Lab are doing groundbreaking work. NM has the fastest computer center in the world. OK, so its at Los Alamos, but what about the resident technology that supports this base? It was once said that the Rio Grande corridor has more PhD's per capita than most anywhere else. (LANL. Sandia, WSMR, NRAO (VLA) ) and the industrial base that supports these labs. I’ve had the good fortune to do a series of portraits for the faculty at UNM’s ECE. The stuff they are working on is right at the cutting edge.

One string that runs through all this is graphics computation, signal processing, and imaging. THESE are the elements of future movies, not so much good natural light and weather. I know we have some good people working in these areas here. Lets hear from them. Lance?





On 7/29/09 5:47 PM, "JANET DAVIDSON" <betbuddy@MSN.COM <http://betbuddy@MSN.COM> > wrote:

***This is a MISP Listserv message. Responses are sent to the list by default.*** ***For more info about MISP and the listserv, scroll to the bottom of the page*** *
Mark, unfortunately those two items actually can go against us. Weather...if you have shot here enough you know that it changes every hour or so. What starts as a snow day ends up sunny and snowless. You have to plan for that. Sets get washed away in the downpours (I've been there.) Lightning puts the crew in danger. Light... beautiful ask any camera person how that affects their lives. Lovely for still photos, interesting for motion pictures. Some enjoy the challenge. When it's we can harness all this it's amazing.


 
So perhaps another mantra is needed...good restaurants?

Janet Davidson
For Giving Productions
betbuddy@msn.com <http://betbuddy@msn.com>
www.ACTjanetdavidson.com <http://www.ACTjanetdavidson.com> <http://www.actjanetdavidson.com/>





 
> Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2009 13:56:03 -0600
> From: mark@unm.edu <http://mark@unm.edu>
> Subject: LEAVING THE LIST /LIST INFO: To leave the list, please email us at: artslab@unm.edu <http://artslab@unm.edu>  For other list info, please visit: http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/web/media-industries-list-info Available in RSS: http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/feed/rss_v2_0_msgs.xml

--
John Maio
Photographer

Studio: (505) 296-4653  Cell: (505) 681-8035

Visit our website at http://www.johnmaiophotography.com
Need an Actor's Reel?  http://jmpreels.com

Re: [MISP] Ca incentive program

Lance and Eric,

You guys naturally get it. I’m not suggesting that we could ask the folks at LANL to quit running real time wave front simulations while we use the facility to render the next blockbuster, but, because of those facilities, we have some very world class people in the image and signal processing fields who now live in the state.

Eric mentioned Sony Image Works. I suspect as they get going they’ll have little problems attracting the people with the skills they need. A lot of this work is collaborative and once you start and then nurture a community of people with the competency and skill sets, it could grow into something, much like Cinnafilm.

We have to educate the people and their legislators that IN ADDITION to good experienced film crews we need to consider these kinds of creative production facilities and the kind of high tech jobs they bring.

I look forward to the time when we’ll celebrate the first animated 3-D academy award winning presentation made entirely in NM.
 
On 7/29/09 9:49 PM, "Lance Maurer" <Lance@CINNAFILM.COM> wrote:

***This is a MISP Listserv message. Responses are sent to the list by default.*** ***For more info about MISP and the listserv, scroll to the bottom of the page*** *
 
Thanks John, not sure what I can offer other than a input based on my experience only.

It seems like we are spinning our wheels again in a panic because we have competition.

The trick to succeeding in any industry is to acknowledge and embrace competition as our motivation.  Instead of pouting about how unfair life is we should be learning and adapting or yes, it WILL come to an end.  Competition is a natural process, and it's complacency that will get you not the "other guys".

My company Cinnafilm has developed the world's most powerful image processing engine - so powerful that ARRI, the most prestigious name in image quality in the film business, signed a mutiyear deal with us, representing a new shift for a very old and proud company.  Our engine does the highest end image processing through file and format conversion, retiming, texture/grain control, film simulation, and much more - boldly taking on several distinct and separate industries with one software package.  I don't mention this as a plug, but as a fact; that I am faced with a constant barrage of competition from may high angles and can tell you it is very hard to stay on top.  But it can be done, you just need good leaders like Hendry and Richardson, because half this game (I do not exaggerate here) is about the relationships you foster and the trust you create over time.  In addition, I have made less than $200 in total from NM productions, and thus go outside the state for all my business.  The reason?  Very little or no professional post-production infrastructure. Something fresher film legislation would help remedy (for instance, it should be the state's DREAM to ensure Sony Imageworks stays put for a long time...).

As far as touting what the labs and such are doing... Frankly, I don't see much practical or commercial value in what they do as it relates to video/film (yet), and as such I don't really see it as having any impact on the film productions or in wooing them here over other places at this time.  The labs have had great technology for a very long time and always will but most of it will never be seen (rightfully so) - they do not rely on Hollywood approval or film productions for their paycheck and so there is no incentive there to go beyond the occasional integration, etc.  

The real trick is setting up tax breaks and laws for entrepenures of any make and model that don't have restrictions/awards based on political or social agenda but rather pure innovative initiative.  Supporting groups like TVC is also helpful (where I learned to write a business plan), and updating the tax incentives to include more post-production and ensuring no termination of their existence for some time to secure folks like SPI is critical.  Yes, it actually is all about the politics, so we must focus our attention there.

Helpful or not,
LM

 

From: NM Media Discussion List [MISP-L@unm.edu] On Behalf Of John Maio [john@JOHNMAIOPHOTOGRAPHY.COM]
Sent: Wednesday, July 29, 2009 6:10 PM
To: MISP-L@LIST.UNM.EDU
Subject: Re: [MISP] Ca incentive program

***This is a MISP Listserv message. Responses are sent to the list by default.*** ***For more info about MISP and the listserv, scroll to the bottom of the page*** * Took the words . . .

One thing we don’t seem to take advantage of – and tout – is our technology base. Eric and the other folks at ARTS Lab are doing groundbreaking work. NM has the fastest computer center in the world. OK, so its at Los Alamos, but what about the resident technology that supports this base? It was once said that the Rio Grande corridor has more PhD's per capita than most anywhere else. (LANL. Sandia, WSMR, NRAO (VLA) ) and the industrial base that supports these labs. I’ve had the good fortune to do a series of portraits for the faculty at UNM’s ECE. The stuff they are working on is right at the cutting edge.

One string that runs through all this is graphics computation, signal processing, and imaging. THESE are the elements of future movies, not so much good natural light and weather. I know we have some good people working in these areas here. Lets hear from them. Lance?



On 7/29/09 5:47 PM, "JANET DAVIDSON" <betbuddy@MSN.COM <UrlBlockedError.aspx> > wrote:

***This is a MISP Listserv message. Responses are sent to the list by default.*** ***For more info about MISP and the listserv, scroll to the bottom of the page*** * Mark, unfortunately those two items actually can go against us. Weather...if you have shot here enough you know that it changes every hour or so. What starts as a snow day ends up sunny and snowless. You have to plan for that. Sets get washed away in the downpours (I've been there.) Lightning puts the crew in danger. Light... beautiful ask any camera person how that affects their lives. Lovely for still photos, interesting for motion pictures. Some enjoy the challenge. When it's we can harness all this it's amazing.
 
So perhaps another mantra is needed...good restaurants?

Janet Davidson
For Giving Productions
betbuddy@msn.com <UrlBlockedError.aspx>
www.ACTjanetdavidson.com <http://www.actjanetdavidson.com/>
 



 
> Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2009 13:56:03 -0600
> From: mark@unm.edu <UrlBlockedError.aspx>
> Subject: LEAVING THE LIST /LIST INFO: To leave the list, please email us at: artslab@unm.edu <UrlBlockedError.aspx>  For other list info, please visit: http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/web/media-industries-list-info Available in RSS: http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/feed/rss_v2_0_msgs.xml

--
John Maio
Photographer

Studio: (505) 296-4653  Cell: (505) 681-8035

Visit our website at http://www.johnmaiophotography.com
Need an Actor's Reel?  http://jmpreels.com

Re: [MISP] Ca incentive program

 

 

Serious question: Way back in 1992 when I was doing the LVNM promotional video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VgTrWof9f8s ) I was told that one reason some movies came out here was for the ambience, the food, the idea of being in New Mexico, etc. Hence some of the things I included in that video.

 

Is that still true – or was it ever true? Are location decisions made strictly on a strictly pragmatic basis, without regard to any of that?

 

 

 


From: NM Media Discussion List [mailto:MISP-L@unm.edu] On Behalf Of Eric Renz-Whitmore
Sent: Thursday, July 30, 2009 9:53 AM
To: MISP-L@LIST.UNM.EDU
Subject: Re: [MISP] Ca incentive program

 

***This is a MISP Listserv message. Responses are sent to the list by default.*** ***For more info about MISP and the listserv, scroll to the bottom of the page*** *
Someone asked, so I should correct myself, I meant to write Reelz Channel instead of ReelFX (don't know what I was thinking).  

 

But let me expand on that just a bit.  

 

I think it's helpful in many ways to look at what New Mexico is doing with film and media as a business.  While it's not the only or even the best way to look at things, it's particularly useful in trying to address questions the LFC has about our return on investment, and/or in competing with other states (and countries) for projects, jobs and locating business.

 

In competing for film jobs, we have to offer a better package than others, selling not only our incentives, but also the ease of doing business with a very responsive film office, the availability of world class facilities, experienced crews, great light and more. Customer satisfaction is huge, so when shows like Breaking Bad and In Plain Sight choose to stay in New Mexico when the raw numbers might suggest someplace else, that's a great sign.  (Big thanks to Jon, IATSE 480 and others for their efforts to keep these shows sold on NM.)

 

But thinking of companies that have chosen to locate or relocate some of their operations here, I think others outside NM are looking at Albuquerque Studios, Imageworks and Reelz Channel to see whether they succeed.  Finding ways to help them achieve success (in some ways delivering on the promise of NM tech goodness) will be very important in determining whether we as a state can repeat the success of film in other media.

 

And then there's Lance -- and a handful of other folks making a real difference with startups and technologies that New Mexico's investment and economic development communities don't quite know what to do with.  It's harder work to support them; less of a model available to create the conditions where more of them can succeed.  But the value of more local success stories like his is tremendous.

 

Eric

 

 

 

 

On Wed, Jul 29, 2009 at 10:12 PM, Eric Renz-Whitmore <ewhitmore@gmail.com> wrote:

Hey :)

I think you're right in that we haven't been able to fully capitalize on all the tech/science capabilities in New Mexico.  But while the idea of leveraging the work of the national labs (and other very smart places) to help grow film and media has been part of the state's Media Industries Strategic Plan (MISP), the lack of apparent progress feels pretty frustrating.  (Given the number of good people working very hard on commercialization and tech transfer... I think it's a harder task than most of us realize.)

Still, and maybe I'm being optimistic for a moment, it does seem like there's progress in this area:

  • One of the focus areas for NMCAC (the NM Supercomputer) is support of high end digital media
  • Los Alamos and the North Central NM economic development organizations have adopted digital media as one of their focus areas
  • The recent agreement for collaboration between UNM, Sandia Labs and the City of Albuquerque has media as one of its priority areas
  • NMSU's Arrowhead Center has been working to promote commercialization of some forms of digital media in the Las Cruces area

Moreover, there have been successes.  Software and technology for games and VFX have been brought out of the labs, but I think one of our biggest successes was encouraging Sony Pictures Imageworks to open operations here.  I know the presence of Imageworks, Albuquerque Studios and more recently ReelFX has made New Mexico more of a real player, encouraging experienced talent (that we still need) to relocate here. 
   
However, I think sustainable success means we need to find ways for small and mid-sized local companies to deliver some of the tech goodness New Mexico has long promised. And we need those companies to grow so students coming out of ECE or CMI (and many other fine places) have options for satisfying work in New Mexico.

But I think the best near term opportunity for tech is finding ways to build on the success we're already having; to package some of our compute-intensive capabilities with film crews, facilities... and that really good light.

btw...  some of this will be part of the talk at next Saturday's NM Postproduction talk at the Albuquerque Film Festival (8/1 @ 3PM). More info on the events list.

Eric





On Wed, Jul 29, 2009 at 6:10 PM, John Maio <john@johnmaiophotography.com> wrote:

***This is a MISP Listserv message. Responses are sent to the list by default.*** ***For more info about MISP and the listserv, scroll to the bottom of the page*** *

Took the words . . .

One thing we don’t seem to take advantage of – and tout – is our technology base. Eric and the other folks at ARTS Lab are doing groundbreaking work. NM has the fastest computer center in the world. OK, so its at Los Alamos, but what about the resident technology that supports this base? It was once said that the Rio Grande corridor has more PhD's per capita than most anywhere else. (LANL. Sandia, WSMR, NRAO (VLA) ) and the industrial base that supports these labs. I’ve had the good fortune to do a series of portraits for the faculty at UNM’s ECE. The stuff they are working on is right at the cutting edge.

One string that runs through all this is graphics computation, signal processing, and imaging. THESE are the elements of future movies, not so much good natural light and weather. I know we have some good people working in these areas here. Lets hear from them. Lance?





On 7/29/09 5:47 PM, "JANET DAVIDSON" <betbuddy@MSN.COM> wrote:

***This is a MISP Listserv message. Responses are sent to the list by default.*** ***For more info about MISP and the listserv, scroll to the bottom of the page*** *

Mark, unfortunately those two items actually can go against us. Weather...if you have shot here enough you know that it changes every hour or so. What starts as a snow day ends up sunny and snowless. You have to plan for that. Sets get washed away in the downpours (I've been there.) Lightning puts the crew in danger. Light... beautiful ask any camera person how that affects their lives. Lovely for still photos, interesting for motion pictures. Some enjoy the challenge. When it's we can harness all this it's amazing.


 
So perhaps another mantra is needed...good restaurants?

Janet Davidson
For Giving Productions
betbuddy@msn.com

www.ACTjanetdavidson.com <http://www.actjanetdavidson.com/>

 



 
> Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2009 13:56:03 -0600
> From: mark@unm.edu
> Subject: LEAVING THE LIST /LIST INFO: To leave the list, please email us at: artslab@unm.edu For other list info, please visit: http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/web/media-industries-list-info Available in RSS: http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/feed/rss_v2_0_msgs.xml


--
John Maio
Photographer

Studio: (505) 296-4653  Cell: (505) 681-8035

Visit our website at http://www.johnmaiophotography.com
Need an Actor's Reel?  http://jmpreels.com

LEAVING THE LIST /LIST INFO: To leave the list, please email us at: artslab@unm.edu For other list info, please visit: http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/web/media-industries-list-info Available in RSS: http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/feed/rss_v2_0_msgs.xml



--
The Albuquerque Film Festival is Coming (8/6-9)
http://www.albuquerquefilmfestival.com

Eric Renz-Whitmore, Program Coordinator
ARTS Lab
GC:     505-993-6884
office:  505-277-2253
cell:     505-227-1086
http://artslab.unm.edu




--
NMBW's Who's Who in Technology (7/23)
Honoring NM's Top Tech Talents
Info at: http://www.bizjournals.com/albuquerque/event/5321?mp=3

Eric Renz-Whitmore, Program Coordinator
ARTS Lab
GC:     505-993-6884
office:  505-277-2253
cell:     505-227-1086
http://artslab.unm.edu

LEAVING THE LIST /LIST INFO: To leave the list, please email us at: artslab@unm.edu For other list info, please visit: http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/web/media-industries-list-info Available in RSS: http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/feed/rss_v2_0_msgs.xml



__________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature database 4291 (20090730) __________

The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

http://www.eset.com