Wednesday, January 28, 2009

[MISP]

I have developed a program proposal that will create funding for Small and Independent Media Ventures. I now have Legislator sponsorship that will submit it as a "Memorial" for consideration at this year Legislative session. If you like a copy please email me at knoll@southwestonline.com and I will email it to you for review and comment.

The message we heard over and over at the Media Summit was that it was time to really jump start the local media business community.

NOTICE: This email is intended solely for the use of the individual to whom it is addressed and may contain information that is privileged, confidential or otherwise exempt from disclosure. If the reader of this email is not the intended recipient or the employee or agent responsible for delivering the message to the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution, or copying of this communication is strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please immediately notify us by telephone at 505-286-2596 and return the original message to us at the listed email address. 

Thank You.
Kenneth Segura Knoll




[MISP] SAVE THE DATE - NMFO Black History Month Free Screenings

***MISP-EVENTS-L is an announcement only listserv*** *
From the New Mexico Film Office:

February 20th and 21st

 

In honor of 2009 Black History Month the New Mexico Film Office will hold free film screenings on February 21, 2009.  Screenings will be open to the public with no cost for admission.  Please join us in celebrating the contributions of creative work by and about African Americans at these special screenings in February.  In addition, the NM Film Office is working with the NM Music Commission in an effort to hold a small public concert in honor of Black History Month on Friday, February 20th.  More details on both nights to come!

 

 

NM FILM MUSEUM (formerly Jean Cocteau Theatre)

418 Montezuma Ave.

Santa Fe, NM  87501

 

 Contact the Film Office with any questions: trish@nmfilm.com | (505) 476-5611

 

nmfilmmakers

Trish Lopez, Program Director

Rochelle Bussey

Phone: 505-476-5600

Fax: 505-476-5601

Email: nm.filmmakers@nmfilm.com

www.nmfilm.com

 


LEAVING THE LIST /LIST INFO: To leave the list, please email us at: artslab@unm.edu For other list info, please visit: http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/web/media-industries-list-info

Monday, January 26, 2009

[MISP] Call for Visual Music @ SIGGRAPH 2009

***MISP-EVENTS-L is an announcement only listserv*** *
I know there are some big fans of 'visual music' out there -- and I hope we can get some good NM representation at this year's SIGGRAPH. More info below...

Visual Music is a genre in which music and images interact in unique and imaginative ways. Since the birth of animation, artists and filmmakers have looked to music for creative guidance. The Computer Animation Festival presents the best artworks that combine music and images, whether created by solo filmmakers or as part of a collaboration, to showcase the wide range of approaches and achievements in Visual Music.

The program includes a mix of invited works and works selected from juried submissions.

The complete list of Visual Music work will be available in May.

Submissions are now being accepted through 4 March 2009.

http://www.siggraph.org/s2009/computer_animation_festival/visual_music/index.php

http://www.siggraph.org/s2009/submissions/caf_films/index.php

--
Thanks to everyone who participated in New Mexico's 5th Annual Media Industries Conference -- "MIX" -- more info at http://www.nm-mix.org

Eric Renz-Whitmore, Program Coordinator
ARTS Lab
MSC04 2570
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131
office:  505-277-2253
cell:     505-227-1086
http://artslab.unm.edu
LEAVING THE LIST /LIST INFO: To leave the list, please email us at: artslab@unm.edu For other list info, please visit: http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/web/media-industries-list-info

Saturday, January 24, 2009

[MISP] sfX Announce: Software Design, Robotics, Nakatani in New Mexico & Computer Physics

***MISP-EVENTS-L is an announcement only listserv*** * More great and fun things going on at the Santa Fe Complex (located conveniently close to the Santa Fe Railyard if that helps).

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Don Begley <don@sfcomplex.org>
Date: Sat, Jan 24, 2009 at 11:12 AM
Subject: sfX Announce: Software Design, Robotics, Nakatani in New Mexico & Computer Physics
To: ewhitmore@gmail.com


sfComplex

Monday, January 26 @ 5:30pm
Software Design with NMHU

Wednesday, January 28 @ 6:00pm
Build a Milling Robot with Legos

Sunday, February 1 @ 7:00pm
Tasuya Nagatani Returns to Santa Fe

Wednesday, February 4 @ 6:00pm
Physics Comes to the Computer

All programs at Santa Fe Complex · 632 Agua Fria · Parking via Romero St. For more information, call 505/216.7562 or visit sfcomplex.org

Software Design at sfX

sfX is hosting a 3-credit course in software design beginning Monday, January 26. The class is is fully accredited undergraduate, upper division through New Mexico Highlands University and taught by Dave West, who has been a professor at NMSU, the College of Santa Fe, and the University of St. Paul in Minnesota. His focus areas are in design, objects, agility, modeling and architecture utilizing Smalltalk with Web tools (HTML, CSS, JavaScript, PHP, MySQL, et al). This freeform class is project based. Anyone interested in working on a project at the Complex and earning college credit for that work is invited to enroll. High school students may enroll (some exposure to computing and programming is assumed). Read more.


Keep current on events and projects at Santa Fe Complex:
Join Our Mailing List!
Follow us on the web
Stay current with Twitter
Subscribe to our RSS feed
1st Meeting - Robotic Lego Milling Machine Project
January 28, 6 - 7pm

Lego Square

Santa Fe Complex and SolidCAM, a world leader in computer-aided machine design, are launching an educational program to teach high school students the principles of modern, computer-based, machine design using Lego robotics and SolidCAM's industry-standard programming software. Anyone from age 14 and up is invited to become a member of the project team. Prior knowledge or experience in modern machining technology is not a prerequisite for participation as this will be an educational exercise teaching skills in mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, software engineering, and computer programming.

Wednesday's meeting is aimed specifically at building the project team. It will be a meet-and-greet with a short demonstration and presentation with refreshments. Read more.

Tatsuya Nakatani Returns to Santa Fe
February 1, 7:00pm
Nakatani
Tatsuya Nakatani returns to New Mexico and Santa Fe to reunite with Mark Weaver and Mike Balistreri after their 2007 performances. The trio explores their similar approaches to space, sound and environment at the complex on February 1. Click here for more information.
 
Physics Comes to the Computer
Wednesday. February 4, 6:00pm

Norm Margolis, Research Affiliate at the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, visits Santa Fe Complex to discuss his first love, the physics of information and computation. He will discuss looking at nature as a computer and looking as computation as physics, his metaphor for the common characteristics between nature, physics and computers. Details coming soon at the sfX website. Norm's webiste is here.
helpBe Part of the Complex

Are you working on a project that fits the complex? Would you like to volunteer to help us with our events or publicity? If so, call us at 505/216.7562 or Click here to let us know how you'd like to volunteer. We need to talk.
 
Come Visit Us
Noisefold Performer Corey Metcalf
Santa Fe Complex is located in the Railyard Art District within walking distance of the hotels, restaurants and shops at the plaza downtown. We're housed in two facilities, the project space at 624 Agua Fria and the common space at 632 Agua Fria.

The conference area contains meeting rooms and facilities for short-term use associated with on-going sfComplex projects. The project space houses the great room, where we hold events and offer Internet access, working facilities, a coffee lounge and work carrels for laptop users.

While there is parking at 624 Agua Fria, the Romero Street parking lot is more conveniently located for the 632 facility. Romero St. is an old-style Santa Fe ox-cart road just east of the 624 driveway. Follow it south from Agua Fris St. until it opens up to two lanes; turn hard right into the parking lot for 632. Or, enter from Manhattan St. & Romero St. to the south.

Here's a map to our location, a representative shot showing the Railyard District and a sketchup drawing of the facility at 632. For more information, call 505/216.7562 or click here.
 
Don Begley
Managing Director
Santa Fe Complex
624 Agua Fria St
Santa Fe, NM 87501
 
Safe Unsubscribe
This email was sent to ewhitmore@gmail.com by don@sfcomplex.org.
Santa Fe Complex | 624 Agua Fria | Santa Fe | NM | 87501



--
Thanks to everyone who participated in New Mexico's 5th Annual Media Industries Conference -- "MIX" -- more info at http://www.nm-mix.org

Eric Renz-Whitmore, Program Coordinator
ARTS Lab
MSC04 2570
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131
office:  505-277-2253
cell:     505-227-1086
http://artslab.unm.edu
LEAVING THE LIST /LIST INFO: To leave the list, please email us at: artslab@unm.edu For other list info, please visit: http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/web/media-industries-list-info

[MISP] Fencing, Puppetry & Acting, next Saturday

***MISP-EVENTS-L is an announcement only listserv*** *

Next Saturday, January 31st, a unique workshop in fencing, puppetry and acting will be offered at 304 Washington Street, SE from 10AM - 5PM.

Arnold Brown will be teaching two hours of fencing and he has been teaching fencing for actors on stage and on camera since the late 70s.  Then Michael McCormick will be teaching two hours of puppetry.  (As many of us know Michael was the puppet master on such films as "Dark Crystal", "Labyrinth", and "Return of the Jedi " -- btw, "Labyrinth" is showing at The Guild tonight around 10:15pm.)  We then take what has been taught and do a two hour acting gig that Darlene Hansen will teach. The class goes from 10-5pm.  The cost is $75.00.   Please let Darlene know if you can attend.  

To register (or get more information), contact Darlene at vivhansen@msn.com or by phone (505) 268-0530. 


--
Thanks to everyone who participated in New Mexico's 5th Annual Media Industries Conference -- "MIX" -- more info at http://www.nm-mix.org

Eric Renz-Whitmore, Program Coordinator
ARTS Lab
MSC04 2570
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131
office:  505-277-2253
cell:     505-227-1086
http://artslab.unm.edu
LEAVING THE LIST /LIST INFO: To leave the list, please email us at: artslab@unm.edu For other list info, please visit: http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/web/media-industries-list-info

Thursday, January 22, 2009

[MISP] 2009 Digital Arts Conference at UNMCE

***MISP-EVENTS-L is an announcement only listserv*** *
From: Anne Dibello <adibello@unm.edu>

Join us for our fourth annual

Digital Arts Conference
Saturday, March 7, 2009, 9:00am-3:30pm

The Road to Creative Success

Keynote presentation by Robin Williams, author of The Non-Designer's
Design Book, on The Best of Both Worlds-Hand-Made and Digital. General
Session presentation by Joey Belville, award-winning music producer, on
The Magic of Digital Audio.

Follow the road to creative success with this exciting one-day
conference exploring current topics and trends in graphic design, web
design, digital photography, filmmaking, and animation. Find out
what's most relevant from professionals in the field. Discover how
to get started in digital arts or how to expand your work. Enjoy great
meals and snacks while networking with the experts. Both amateurs and
professionals will find this day helpful and productive.

Conference topic choices include: high dynamic range photography,
creating a DVD with Final Cut Studio, game design with Flash,
photography in New Mexico, advances in digital camcorders, marketing
success, accessible websites, image enhancement with Photoshop CS4, film
production, and more. Exhibitor tables, giveaways, meals provided.

$139/$99 for full-time students.
Held at the UNM Continuing Education Conference Center
1634 University Blvd NE in Albuquerque

For more information:
<http://dce.unm.edu/digital-arts-conference.htm>

Contact
Caroline Orcutt
Digital Arts Program Supervisor
UNM Continuing Education
(505) 277-6037
<digitalarts@dce.unm.edu>





--
Thanks to everyone who participated in New Mexico's 5th Annual Media Industries Conference -- "MIX" -- more info at http://www.nm-mix.org

Eric Renz-Whitmore, Program Coordinator
ARTS Lab
MSC04 2570
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131
office:  505-277-2253
cell:     505-227-1086
http://artslab.unm.edu LEAVING THE LIST /LIST INFO: To leave the list, please email us at: artslab@unm.edu For other list info, please visit: http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/web/media-industries-list-info

[MISP] Incentive Bait Reels in Hollywood Production Bucks

***This is a MISP Listserv message. Responses are sent to the list by default.*** ***For more info about MISP and the listserv, scroll to the bottom of the page*** *
Guest Columnist Eric Witt (
film and media industries adviser to Gov. Bill Richardson) continues to make the case for the importance of incentives in yesterday's Albuquerque Journal:

Incentive Bait Reels in Hollywood Production Bucks

By Eric Witt
A new study that looks at the impact of the film industry on New Mexico's economy, conducted by the respected Ernst & Young company, shows strongly positive results: Hundreds of millions of dollars in direct film production spending, and over 9,000 new jobs attributable to the industry benefitting dozens of communities and hundreds of local businesses across the state.
There is strong evidence of positive effects not only for direct film production, but increasingly for the hospitality, tourism and other support sectors as well as priceless marketing of New Mexico's unmatched beauty and aggressive business environment to the world.
Most pointedly, the film study shows that state coffers directly recover almost every penny paid out in production tax incentives through increased revenues generated by the film industry. This is consistent with Gov. Bill Richardson's long-held position that the state "breaks even" for extending a nominal 25 percent rebate level to the film industry.
Additionally, when county and local governments are factored in, the return is another 56 cents on top of that, making for an overall positive return to combined state and local governments of about $1.50 for every incentive dollar spent.
And note that this is only governmental revenue; it does not take into account the vastly greater increases to private businesses and workers through the $700 plus million in direct production spending and the $2.2 billion in economic activity attributable to this industry since 2003.
What does this mean on the ground?
Well, we can start with the thousands of well-above-average paying jobs that have gone to ordinary New Mexicans across the state, jobs with health care and benefits.
We can point to the hundreds of businesses that have been created, been able to expand or, in some cases, simply survive due to this industry.
We can talk about the positive offset the industry has had in the general economy as other sectors have declined — the most recent and dramatic example being the past week's job fair for ReelzChannel in Albuquerque at which 2,500 applicants showed up for 100 jobs.
As the new study bears out, the advent of the film industry has contributed significantly to New Mexico's economic position of relative strength versus other states and the national and global economies. Essentially we have created a $2.2 billion stimulus package and more than 9,000 new jobs to the great benefit to the private and public sectors, at a critical time.
These Ernst & Young findings stand in stark contrast to those put forward last summer by the Arrowhead Center at New Mexico State University, which drastically underestimated the economic impact of the film industry.
To be sure, that earlier NMSU study was, by its authors' own admission, extremely narrow in focus and based wholly on a standardized computer model and not on actual field work; it was never intended to be portrayed as a definitive or even accurate depiction of the overall effects of the industry or its return to the state.
Yet certain interests in the state have wrongly held it out as such, despite being informed in detail of the NMSU study's limitations when it was released last August.
While Ernst & Young's work is itself a broader but still not complete accounting of the industry's overall effects, we can only hope that those same interests will embrace this new report — a rigorous, field-researched study conducted by a globally respected independent party — with the same enthusiasm.
The bottom line is that the new analysis affirms the gut feeling and daily observations of most New Mexicans: The making of movies here is having tremendous positive effects for New Mexico precisely when we need them the most.
Eric Witt is the film and media industries adviser to Gov. Bill Richardson

--
Posted By e to NM Media Industry News at 1/22/2009 12:33:00 PM


--
Thanks to everyone who participated in New Mexico's 5th Annual Media Industries Conference -- "MIX" -- more info at http://www.nm-mix.org

Eric Renz-Whitmore, Program Coordinator
ARTS Lab
MSC04 2570
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131
office:  505-277-2253
cell:     505-227-1086
http://artslab.unm.edu LEAVING THE LIST /LIST INFO: To leave the list, please email us at: artslab@unm.edu For other list info, please visit: http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/web/media-industries-list-info Available in RSS: http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/feed/rss_v2_0_msgs.xml

Re: [MISP] New Mexico's Film and Education Programs Next Steps

Dear Dr. Flores,
 
Thank you for your comprehensive analysis,  I strongly believe that if we all pull together in the same direction our future, meaning that of the youth in New Mexico, will be make it better for all of us.
 
Sincerely,
 
Frank Zuniga
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, January 21, 2009 2:14 PM
Subject: Re: [MISP] New Mexico's Film and Education Programs Next Steps

***This is a MISP Listserv message. Responses are sent to the list by default.*** ***For more info about MISP and the listserv, scroll to the bottom of the page*** *
Hi everyone...

Dr. William Flores, Deputy Secretary of Education -- and a longtime promoter of both media industry growth and 21st Century skills -- kindly passed along the following notes for his talk at last Friday's NM Media Industries Summit.

Some people still question the prominent role education has had in growing the media industry sector, and the investment New Mexico continues to make in these programs.  I don't think anyone articulates the increasing relevance and strategic importance of education better than Dr. Flores. I urge you to read the following -- especially if you're talking with your legislators and other leaders in your community:

"New Mexico's Film and Education Programs Next Steps: Creating 21st Century Learning Environments"
William Flores
Presentation to the MIX Conference, January 16, 2009:
  • There would be no film or media programs at a many schools if it hadn't been for Governor Richardson's commitment of $10 million in capital outlay funds to initiate a Film Institute.
  • The Governor's Film and Media Industries Council urged development of film programs as well as efforts to attract film production to New Mexico proceed and a plan be drafted.
  • The MISP strategy was developed on a build-out of film and digital initiatives
  • The Governor submitted legislation establishing the Film Incentive Program, at the time the most generous in the country;
  • Eric Witt, in the Governor's office, met with university representatives to solicit proposals.
  • At the time, I was interim president at NMSU and had already begun discussions with some faculty and staff about coordinating the existing film, television, digital arts and simulation efforts on campus. NMSU immediately submitted a proposal, as did UNM and others.
  • The FTTP program was launched spearheaded by John Hendry
  • Over the next few years, with the help of the Governor and the Legislature, several institutions began establishing film programs and film crew training programs.
  • By 2007, 85 films had been made in New Mexico or were under production generating more than $1.2 billion in revenues.
  • Film studios were built or are underway in Albuquerque and Santa Fe and SONY developed an IPAX center in ABQ. Post-production facilities are in the works.
  • The state has supported Lambda Rail, Internet 2, and a Gig a POP at UNM
  • The state has the fastest supercomputer in the world and the Super-Computing Challenge to ignite the imagination of kids in math, science, and computer engineering.
  • We now have film crew programs, animation, digital arts, and simulation courses and programs underway at most community colleges and several four-year institutions. UNM is initiating its BFA program and NMSU has over 200 students in their film and digital arts program.
  • In 2008, the Governor's Film and Media Industries Council, the Governor's office, and the Film Office began working on a new five-year plan (MISP 2).
  • Middle Schools and High Schools have now developed film courses and programs (including Charter Schools devoted to film and media arts)
  • Also, in 2008, HED was asked by the Governor's office to establish an articulation and transfer program from the two-year to four-year institutions with two tracks and to develop various career pathways:
    • 1) two-year to four-year;
    • 2) FTP to AA and BA or BFA and ways in which those working in the industry can earn credits towards the AA or BA.
    • 3) initiate discussions with the middle schools and high schools to articulate their programs with higher ed.
    HED has formally established a Film and Digital Arts Articulation Task Force with representatives from community colleges and four-year institutions. They met yesterday at UNM and the work is underway. This afternoon Len Malry (HED) and Eric Spencer (PED) will present on pathways and dual credit in the high schools. You will hear presentations on the Super-Computer.

While much has been accomplished, there are challenges ahead. The Film Incentive Program is under attack from several quarters, including some in the LFC who feel the program has not produced funds, but cost money to the state. That concern was worsened by the Arrowhead Center study that maintains that the state gets back only 14 cents for every dollar invested. The Film Office has commissioned a separate study that examines a much broader range of revenue streams (such as restaurant and hotel revenues, catering, lumber and supplies, etc.), which will be released by the Governor's office this afternoon. In the past five years, 115 films have been produced here in New Mexico as a result of the Film Incentive Program and billions have flown into the state.

Next Steps: Creating 21st Century Learning Environments

We have to realize that the world is rapidly changing and that New Mexico can be a center for new and emerging industries. Digital arts and simulation are changing our lives. Just think about how our lives have changed in the past decade. We now text message, read our emails on our phones, watch YouTube and network with FaceBook, pretend to be Rock Stars in our living rooms, and play WarCraft with people we can't see who might be in Croatia, China, Egypt, or our next door neighbor. Some of you own islands or have avatars in Second Life. Most of this didn't exist ten years ago. Some of it didn't exist two or three years ago. The world is changing rapidly and we must change with it.

Gaming and simulation are becoming multi-billion dollar industries. While a film is a blockbuster if it brings in $100 million over a three-day weekend, several games that were released in the past two years brought in over $300 million in their first week of release. There are 1 billion personal computers and more than 3.3 billion cell phones in usage in today's world (about 1 for every two persons). Within a few years, Netflix expects to have more films delivered to television and iPods than are sent in the mail. Television 2.0 means you get downloads to your G3 phone and MP3s and iPods. This morning I watched a news clip from CNM and read the New York Times on my cell phone.

Mobile Learning is "anywhere, anytime learning." It has the potential of reaching underserved children, who may not have a computer, but do have a cell phone. It can promote 21st-century learning through social interactions, by fostering collaboration and peer-learning and mentorship. My 15 year old niece took courses online at UC Berkeley because she joined a sci fi blog, started emailing questions, and met a student at Berkeley who encouraged her to take the course.

Today's youth live in an "always on" world, text messaging to their friends, checking their Facebook and MySpace sites, and uploading photos and videos to Flickr and YouTube. They learn from their peers more than they do from their teachers. And, they have learned digital 'work-arounds' to hook-up on line or 'hang-out' with friends (around parental "grounding" or being condemned to "isolation" in their bedrooms to "do homework." Their networking and native use of media equips them for new modes of learning. 21st Century Learning requires that new media literary be integrated into state and national educational standards. USC has formed the Institute for Multimedia Literacy to develop 21st Century literacy skills. The Dean of the School of Cinema-Television at USC, Elizabeth Daley argues that "those who are truly literate in the 21st century will be those who both read and write the multimedia language of the screen." The Partnership for 21st Century Skills urges educators to integrate visual and multimedia literacy into standards and teaching.

21st Century Skills in k-12 include learning to develop and deliver presentations in various media, understand and critique presentations, and express opinions regarding what they see and interact with. For example, some schools now require kids to developing film clips and PowerPoint presentations in the sixth grade. The MacArthur Foundation's study on Living and Learning with New Media argue that educational institutions must learn to take advantage of peer-based learning and learn how to work within these social networking tools, encourage on-line learning communities, and the use of what Chris Dede and others refer to as Serious Games which promote learning and model behavior.

Each day there are more applications for the Virtual World. Serious games can be applied to solve serious problems that face us on health care, city planning, the environment, and many other areas. Mathematicians at UCLA have developed 3 dimensional virtual surgery based on actual patients to permit surgeons to do the virtual surgery before they cut into the body.

The Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars in Washington, D.C. has launched the Serious Games Initiative to encourage simulation applications and platforms for helping solve every day problems that cities, states, and policy makers confront in education, health care, and public finance. There are now FlickR, Slideshare, YouTube, and Delicious channels devoted to Serious Gaming, as well as a Serious Gaming Taxonomy. A Serious Gaming Summit will be held March 22-24th of this year at the GDC in San Francisco.

Through simulation I have "flown" the Space Shuttle, but my heart beat just like I actually in re-entry. Immersive environments create three-dimensional learning experiences. The NSF has funded multi-user virtual environments for leaning, one such project is River City, where students confront sudden illness in a virtual world, a 19th Century city, and have to determine possible sources of the illness, interviewing residents, hospital workers, and victims of the illness. They learn biology, epidemiology, and public health.

Virtual learning disrupts old paradigm of hierarchical school-based instruction with new epistemologies. It promotes situational and active learning, team-work, hypothesis-building, testing, and multiple correct answers, as well as transfer of what they've learned to the real world. Assessment can be based less on tests and more on performance and application. Simulation-modeling and interactive gaming is being used for First Responder Training. NMSU, NMMI, and ENMU-Roswell have an initiative based on NMSU's training project with DOD that is an interactive digital film for emergency training. Urban Planners and water engineers are using simulation modeling to re-envision American cities, transportation, and water systems.

The U.S. Army has already contracted and universities have begun to offer online courses and podcast courses to soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan. Learning Games, simulations, and interactive problem-solving are being used in K-12 to teach math and science in North Carolina among others. A new study, "Pockets of Potential," released this week calls on the Obama administration to establish a digital-investment fund to accelerate educational reform and to promote mobile learning and innovation, as well as 21st Century digital teaching force.

New learning platforms, simulations, immersive environments all are being developed right here in New Mexico. We have major research universities (UNM, Tech, NMSU) and the national labs. We have the Super-Computer and we have a niche that can develop into new start-ups and, later, industries. We should be developing the software, hardware, and learning platforms that can be used to raise student achievement in New Mexico, but that can become applications that school districts and universities all over the country can adopt.

We have been focusing on film and that's a good thing. I am not asking for us to stop making films, but rather to expand into other fields. Film is simply one medium and the new media are opening up markets that we didn't even think about ten years ago.

The connected, integrated, seamless, and interactive world is the reality of the 21st Century. New Mexico should be on the ground floor of this new wave of digital learning and develop industries to meet that new and emerging market. The Film incentive program has started the way. Now it is up to us to map out the new industries that we will develop to grow New Mexico's economy and to become a national leader in the new wave industries of the future. Let this conference be a beginning step to that future!

###



--
New Mexico's 5th Annual Media Industries Conference -- "MIX" -- is coming January 17th.  Sign up at http://www.nm-mix.org

Eric Renz-Whitmore, Program Coordinator
ARTS Lab
MSC04 2570
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131
office:  505-277-2253
cell:     505-227-1086
http://artslab.unm.edu
LEAVING THE LIST /LIST INFO: To leave the list, please email us at: artslab@unm.edu For other list info, please visit: http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/web/media-industries-list-info Available in RSS: http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/feed/rss_v2_0_msgs.xml

Wednesday, January 21, 2009

[MISP] National Film Challenge: NM Team takes Audience Award!

***MISP-EVENTS-L is an announcement only listserv*** *
New Mexico's "Team Ultimatum" has won the Audience Award in the 2008 National Film Challenge -- earning $500 and a showing at the Miami International Film Festival for their "Super Atomic Commies" -- Congratulations to the group!

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Doug Whyte <doug@kdhx.org>
Date: Wed, Jan 21, 2009 at 5:51 PM
Subject: National Film Challenge Winners
To: Eric <ewhitmore@gmail.com>


The judges and audience have spoken and the winners of the
2008 National Film Challenge have been determined! Watch the
award winners here:

http://www.filmchallenge.org/awards

And be sure to reserve your spot in the upcoming International
Documentary Challenge. Registration has begun and space is limited.

http://www.docchallenge.org

Cheers,
Doug Whyte
Film Challenge & Doc Challenge Producer

This email was sent to ewhitmore@gmail.com.
You can instantly unsubscribe from these emails by clicking the link below:
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--
New Mexico's 5th Annual Media Industries Conference -- "MIX" -- is coming January 17th.  Sign up at http://www.nm-mix.org

Eric Renz-Whitmore, Program Coordinator
ARTS Lab
MSC04 2570
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131
office:  505-277-2253
cell:     505-227-1086
http://artslab.unm.edu
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Re: [MISP] New Mexico=?windows-1252?Q?=92s?= Film and Education Programs Next Steps

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Hi everyone...

Dr. William Flores, Deputy Secretary of Education -- and a longtime promoter of both media industry growth and 21st Century skills -- kindly passed along the following notes for his talk at last Friday's NM Media Industries Summit.

Some people still question the prominent role education has had in growing the media industry sector, and the investment New Mexico continues to make in these programs.  I don't think anyone articulates the increasing relevance and strategic importance of education better than Dr. Flores. I urge you to read the following -- especially if you're talking with your legislators and other leaders in your community:

"New Mexico's Film and Education Programs Next Steps: Creating 21st Century Learning Environments"
William Flores
Presentation to the MIX Conference, January 16, 2009:
  • There would be no film or media programs at a many schools if it hadn't been for Governor Richardson's commitment of $10 million in capital outlay funds to initiate a Film Institute.
  • The Governor's Film and Media Industries Council urged development of film programs as well as efforts to attract film production to New Mexico proceed and a plan be drafted.
  • The MISP strategy was developed on a build-out of film and digital initiatives
  • The Governor submitted legislation establishing the Film Incentive Program, at the time the most generous in the country;
  • Eric Witt, in the Governor's office, met with university representatives to solicit proposals.
  • At the time, I was interim president at NMSU and had already begun discussions with some faculty and staff about coordinating the existing film, television, digital arts and simulation efforts on campus. NMSU immediately submitted a proposal, as did UNM and others.
  • The FTTP program was launched spearheaded by John Hendry
  • Over the next few years, with the help of the Governor and the Legislature, several institutions began establishing film programs and film crew training programs.
  • By 2007, 85 films had been made in New Mexico or were under production generating more than $1.2 billion in revenues.
  • Film studios were built or are underway in Albuquerque and Santa Fe and SONY developed an IPAX center in ABQ. Post-production facilities are in the works.
  • The state has supported Lambda Rail, Internet 2, and a Gig a POP at UNM
  • The state has the fastest supercomputer in the world and the Super-Computing Challenge to ignite the imagination of kids in math, science, and computer engineering.
  • We now have film crew programs, animation, digital arts, and simulation courses and programs underway at most community colleges and several four-year institutions. UNM is initiating its BFA program and NMSU has over 200 students in their film and digital arts program.
  • In 2008, the Governor's Film and Media Industries Council, the Governor's office, and the Film Office began working on a new five-year plan (MISP 2).
  • Middle Schools and High Schools have now developed film courses and programs (including Charter Schools devoted to film and media arts)
  • Also, in 2008, HED was asked by the Governor's office to establish an articulation and transfer program from the two-year to four-year institutions with two tracks and to develop various career pathways:
    • 1) two-year to four-year;
    • 2) FTP to AA and BA or BFA and ways in which those working in the industry can earn credits towards the AA or BA.
    • 3) initiate discussions with the middle schools and high schools to articulate their programs with higher ed.
    HED has formally established a Film and Digital Arts Articulation Task Force with representatives from community colleges and four-year institutions. They met yesterday at UNM and the work is underway. This afternoon Len Malry (HED) and Eric Spencer (PED) will present on pathways and dual credit in the high schools. You will hear presentations on the Super-Computer.

While much has been accomplished, there are challenges ahead. The Film Incentive Program is under attack from several quarters, including some in the LFC who feel the program has not produced funds, but cost money to the state. That concern was worsened by the Arrowhead Center study that maintains that the state gets back only 14 cents for every dollar invested. The Film Office has commissioned a separate study that examines a much broader range of revenue streams (such as restaurant and hotel revenues, catering, lumber and supplies, etc.), which will be released by the Governor's office this afternoon. In the past five years, 115 films have been produced here in New Mexico as a result of the Film Incentive Program and billions have flown into the state.

Next Steps: Creating 21st Century Learning Environments

We have to realize that the world is rapidly changing and that New Mexico can be a center for new and emerging industries. Digital arts and simulation are changing our lives. Just think about how our lives have changed in the past decade. We now text message, read our emails on our phones, watch YouTube and network with FaceBook, pretend to be Rock Stars in our living rooms, and play WarCraft with people we can't see who might be in Croatia, China, Egypt, or our next door neighbor. Some of you own islands or have avatars in Second Life. Most of this didn't exist ten years ago. Some of it didn't exist two or three years ago. The world is changing rapidly and we must change with it.

Gaming and simulation are becoming multi-billion dollar industries. While a film is a blockbuster if it brings in $100 million over a three-day weekend, several games that were released in the past two years brought in over $300 million in their first week of release. There are 1 billion personal computers and more than 3.3 billion cell phones in usage in today's world (about 1 for every two persons). Within a few years, Netflix expects to have more films delivered to television and iPods than are sent in the mail. Television 2.0 means you get downloads to your G3 phone and MP3s and iPods. This morning I watched a news clip from CNM and read the New York Times on my cell phone.

Mobile Learning is "anywhere, anytime learning." It has the potential of reaching underserved children, who may not have a computer, but do have a cell phone. It can promote 21st-century learning through social interactions, by fostering collaboration and peer-learning and mentorship. My 15 year old niece took courses online at UC Berkeley because she joined a sci fi blog, started emailing questions, and met a student at Berkeley who encouraged her to take the course.

Today's youth live in an "always on" world, text messaging to their friends, checking their Facebook and MySpace sites, and uploading photos and videos to Flickr and YouTube. They learn from their peers more than they do from their teachers. And, they have learned digital 'work-arounds' to hook-up on line or 'hang-out' with friends (around parental "grounding" or being condemned to "isolation" in their bedrooms to "do homework." Their networking and native use of media equips them for new modes of learning. 21st Century Learning requires that new media literary be integrated into state and national educational standards. USC has formed the Institute for Multimedia Literacy to develop 21st Century literacy skills. The Dean of the School of Cinema-Television at USC, Elizabeth Daley argues that "those who are truly literate in the 21st century will be those who both read and write the multimedia language of the screen." The Partnership for 21st Century Skills urges educators to integrate visual and multimedia literacy into standards and teaching.

21st Century Skills in k-12 include learning to develop and deliver presentations in various media, understand and critique presentations, and express opinions regarding what they see and interact with. For example, some schools now require kids to developing film clips and PowerPoint presentations in the sixth grade. The MacArthur Foundation's study on Living and Learning with New Media argue that educational institutions must learn to take advantage of peer-based learning and learn how to work within these social networking tools, encourage on-line learning communities, and the use of what Chris Dede and others refer to as Serious Games which promote learning and model behavior.

Each day there are more applications for the Virtual World. Serious games can be applied to solve serious problems that face us on health care, city planning, the environment, and many other areas. Mathematicians at UCLA have developed 3 dimensional virtual surgery based on actual patients to permit surgeons to do the virtual surgery before they cut into the body.

The Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars in Washington, D.C. has launched the Serious Games Initiative to encourage simulation applications and platforms for helping solve every day problems that cities, states, and policy makers confront in education, health care, and public finance. There are now FlickR, Slideshare, YouTube, and Delicious channels devoted to Serious Gaming, as well as a Serious Gaming Taxonomy. A Serious Gaming Summit will be held March 22-24th of this year at the GDC in San Francisco.

Through simulation I have "flown" the Space Shuttle, but my heart beat just like I actually in re-entry. Immersive environments create three-dimensional learning experiences. The NSF has funded multi-user virtual environments for leaning, one such project is River City, where students confront sudden illness in a virtual world, a 19th Century city, and have to determine possible sources of the illness, interviewing residents, hospital workers, and victims of the illness. They learn biology, epidemiology, and public health.

Virtual learning disrupts old paradigm of hierarchical school-based instruction with new epistemologies. It promotes situational and active learning, team-work, hypothesis-building, testing, and multiple correct answers, as well as transfer of what they've learned to the real world. Assessment can be based less on tests and more on performance and application. Simulation-modeling and interactive gaming is being used for First Responder Training. NMSU, NMMI, and ENMU-Roswell have an initiative based on NMSU's training project with DOD that is an interactive digital film for emergency training. Urban Planners and water engineers are using simulation modeling to re-envision American cities, transportation, and water systems.

The U.S. Army has already contracted and universities have begun to offer online courses and podcast courses to soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan. Learning Games, simulations, and interactive problem-solving are being used in K-12 to teach math and science in North Carolina among others. A new study, "Pockets of Potential," released this week calls on the Obama administration to establish a digital-investment fund to accelerate educational reform and to promote mobile learning and innovation, as well as 21st Century digital teaching force.

New learning platforms, simulations, immersive environments all are being developed right here in New Mexico. We have major research universities (UNM, Tech, NMSU) and the national labs. We have the Super-Computer and we have a niche that can develop into new start-ups and, later, industries. We should be developing the software, hardware, and learning platforms that can be used to raise student achievement in New Mexico, but that can become applications that school districts and universities all over the country can adopt.

We have been focusing on film and that's a good thing. I am not asking for us to stop making films, but rather to expand into other fields. Film is simply one medium and the new media are opening up markets that we didn't even think about ten years ago.

The connected, integrated, seamless, and interactive world is the reality of the 21st Century. New Mexico should be on the ground floor of this new wave of digital learning and develop industries to meet that new and emerging market. The Film incentive program has started the way. Now it is up to us to map out the new industries that we will develop to grow New Mexico's economy and to become a national leader in the new wave industries of the future. Let this conference be a beginning step to that future!

###



--
New Mexico's 5th Annual Media Industries Conference -- "MIX" -- is coming January 17th.  Sign up at http://www.nm-mix.org

Eric Renz-Whitmore, Program Coordinator
ARTS Lab
MSC04 2570
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131
office:  505-277-2253
cell:     505-227-1086
http://artslab.unm.edu
LEAVING THE LIST /LIST INFO: To leave the list, please email us at: artslab@unm.edu For other list info, please visit: http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/web/media-industries-list-info Available in RSS: http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/feed/rss_v2_0_msgs.xml

Monday, January 19, 2009

[MISP] Fwd: On Duke City Fix: Emily & Jason launch Webuquerque!

***MISP-EVENTS-L is an announcement only listserv*** *
The growth of our local web design and development community is pretty cool.  There's really a wealth of talent around.  That's one reason it's especially cool that Webuquerque -- a new face for the local Adobe Users Group -- is being launched this Wednesday.  For more info, check out the info and (many) links below.

Local web practitioners, Emily Lewis and Jason Nakai, are kicking it off this Wednesday at the Uptown Bar & Grill:

http://www.dukecityfix.com/events/introducing-webuquerque
http://m.twitter.com/Webuquerque

Unlike the monthly web geeks happy hour, Webuquerque offers speakers and professional development in addition to socializing. Check it out!

Visit ABQ Web Geeks at:
http://www.dukecityfix.com/groups/group/show?id=1233957%3AGroup%3A1383

--
To control which emails you receive on Duke City Fix, go to:
http://www.dukecityfix.com/profiles/profile/emailSettings




--
New Mexico's 5th Annual Media Industries Conference -- "MIX" -- is coming January 17th.  Sign up at http://www.nm-mix.org

Eric Renz-Whitmore, Program Coordinator
ARTS Lab
MSC04 2570
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131
office:  505-277-2253
cell:     505-227-1086
http://artslab.unm.edu
LEAVING THE LIST /LIST INFO: To leave the list, please email us at: artslab@unm.edu For other list info, please visit: http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/web/media-industries-list-info

Re: [MISP] Thinking of a life well-lived...

***This is a MISP Listserv message. Responses are sent to the list by default.*** ***For more info about MISP and the listserv, scroll to the bottom of the page*** *

The man was a giant. An extraordinary talent we'll never see again...'cuz we're old!

Well done...

Gene


Quoting Jim Terr <bluecanyon2@NEWMEXICO.COM>:

> ***This is a MISP Listserv message. Responses are sent to the list 
> by default.***
> ***For more info about MISP and the listserv, scroll to the bottom 
> of the page***
> *
>
>
>
> ...due to the recent passing of someone close, I wanted to share this piece
> on Steve Allen, whom those of us over 50 or so will remember.
>
>
>
> There's also a reference to FILM NETWORKING IN NEW MEXICO, boldfaced below.
> Many of us over 30 or 40 might remember "Schmoozarama '96."
>
>
>
>       Jim Terr    <http://www.JimTerr.com> www.JimTerr.com
>
>            Santa Fe, New Mexico USA  505-989-9298
>
>                 "300,000 YouTube views and counting..."
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> STEVE ALLEN KEPT ME ALIVE
>         By Jim Terr (c)  (As printed in the Albuquerque Tribune, November
> 18, 2000)
>
> In 1957 I was eight years old, a third grader in the tiny tourist town of
> Charlevoix, Michigan. It was a sunny childhood, full of warmth, closeness
> and gay laughter.
>
> Actually, it wasn't. In addition to being in a small, chilly community in
> the post-McCarthy 1950s, I had my own precocious sense of ennui, a
> well-developed melancholy and alienation far beyond my years.
>
> We didn't have a television until I was about six or seven, and not much on
> TV really amused me. Children's shows bored or scared me, and although I
> loved Dinah Shore and Perry Como for their warm personalities, the songs
> that they and their guests crooned left me cold.
>
>  <http://bluecanyonproductions.com/steveallen.html>
>
>
>
>
>
> Into this emotional vacuum stepped Steve Allen, with his weekly variety show
> on NBC-TV. (Mr. Allen died October 30, peacefully in his sleep, thank God.)
> Like the Beatles years later, Steve Allen's zaniness and intelligence was a
> lifeline of hope for me in a barren, mostly humorless world.
>
> The fact that Mr. Allen was also well on his way to writing the 8,500 songs
> and 53 books he eventually authored, the fact that he was a serious crusader
> who was always aware of the social and political context in which he lived,
> were things I wasn't aware of at the time. Or perhaps I just assumed they
> were normal for public figures, which of course they are not.
>
> What I was aware of was his irrepressible wit and spontaneity. Even today he
> is credited not only with having invented the late-night talk show (he
> originated the Tonight Show), but he's acknowledged as being the greatest
> ad-libber of all time. Irreverent, totally non-linear, he refused to take
> anything seriously.
>
> Here's his delivery of an ad for Coldene Stick Chest Rub, whose teleprompter
> script was a straight pitch for avoiding the "greasy, gooey mess" of
> "ordinary greasy rubs."
>
> Allen: "Say, do you smear your youngsters like this when they have a cold?
> Do they smear you right back? Gets pretty gooey, doesn't it? Well, friends,
> stick by those gooey kids of yours. They're the best friend your car ever
> had. But finally somebody has taken the grease and messiness out, and put
> grit and grime back in.
>       Here's what I mean, and I wish I knew. It's called Coldene Stick Chest
> Rub, and you just stick it in your old rubbery chest.Watch how to avoid the
> messiness and discomfort of eating fried chicken with your bare hands. Your
> fingers never even touch it. That's right. The whole operation is handled by
> your toes...."
>
> Allen sent me an autographed copy of his book, "How to be Funny; discovering
> the comic you," in which this and many other such items appear, a few years
> ago, after I had sent him a note letting him know how much he meant to me
> and millions of others of my generation. He also put me on his list to
> receive his frequent mailings of clippings on the many issues he felt were
> important -- underlined and asterisked.
>
> Several months later I invited him to attend a film-and-video networking
> event here in Santa Fe called "Schmoozarama '96." He sent his regrets and
> best wishes in an open letter which began as follows:
>
> "Having devoted a good part of my life to schmoozing and a not insignificant
> portion of my energies to ramming I am naturally not loathe - whatever that
> means - to participate in the general encouragement of whatever it is that
> you people are up to. On the general understanding that nothing you are
> doing is either illegal or immoral you may count me among your
> supporters..."
>
> In the outpouring of articles and testimonials that followed Mr. Allen's
> death, many of his colleagues and friends spoke not only about his
> incredible wit and his extraordinary output as a Renaissance Man, but about
> his kindness and decency, his warmth and gentlemanliness.
>
> As for his social concerns (his latest one being the rise of vulgarity in
> entertainment and media) he never stopped, and he was crusading in crisp,
> clear, erudite sentences right up to his last week.
>
> A friend of his wrote that the two seminal experiences of Allen's life were
> the gratitude he felt at being treated to a cup of coffee and a hot dog when
> he was cold and homeless one night at age 16, and the tearful gratitude he
> felt when he found out that his wife, Jayne, did not have cancer after all.
> Allen, an agnostic, speculated that the earliest prayers of primitive man
> were probably prayers of gratitude.
>
> With that deep sense of gratitude for a life well-lived and for a true role
> model and inspiration, I say thank you and goodbye, Steve. You'll never know
> what a difference you made.
>
> Jim Terr is a singer-songwriter and humorist who lives in Santa Fe, New
> Mexico at www.JimTerr.com. Hear an interview
> <http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4055932>  with Steve
> Allen here.
>
>
>
>
> LEAVING THE LIST /LIST INFO:
> To leave the list, please email us at: artslab@unm.edu
> For other list info, please visit: 
> http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/web/media-industries-list-info
> Available in RSS: 
> http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/feed/rss_v2_0_msgs.xml
>

LEAVING THE LIST /LIST INFO: To leave the list, please email us at: artslab@unm.edu For other list info, please visit: http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/web/media-industries-list-info Available in RSS: http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/feed/rss_v2_0_msgs.xml

[MISP] Thinking of a life well-lived...

 

...due to the recent passing of someone close, I wanted to share this piece on Steve Allen, whom those of us over 50 or so will remember.

 

There’s also a reference to FILM NETWORKING IN NEW MEXICO, boldfaced below. Many of us over 30 or 40 might remember “Schmoozarama ‘96.”

 

      Jim Terr   www.JimTerr.com

           Santa Fe, New Mexico USA  505-989-9298

                "300,000 YouTube views and counting..." 

 

 

 

 


STEVE ALLEN KEPT ME ALIVE

        By Jim Terr
(c)  (As printed in the Albuquerque Tribune, November 18, 2000)

In 1957 I was eight years old, a third grader in the tiny tourist town of Charlevoix, Michigan. It was a sunny childhood, full of warmth, closeness and gay laughter.

Actually, it wasn't. In addition to being in a small, chilly community in the post-McCarthy 1950s, I had my own precocious sense of ennui, a well-developed melancholy and alienation far beyond my years.

We didn't have a television until I was about six or seven, and not much on TV really amused me. Children's shows bored or scared me, and although I loved Dinah Shore and Perry Como for their warm personalities, the songs that they and their guests crooned left me cold.

 


Into this emotional vacuum stepped Steve Allen, with his weekly variety show on NBC-TV. (Mr. Allen died October 30, peacefully in his sleep, thank God.) Like the Beatles years later, Steve Allen's zaniness and intelligence was a lifeline of hope for me in a barren, mostly humorless world.

The fact that Mr. Allen was also well on his way to writing the 8,500 songs and 53 books he eventually authored, the fact that he was a serious crusader who was always aware of the social and political context in which he lived, were things I wasn't aware of at the time. Or perhaps I just assumed they were normal for public figures, which of course they are not.

What I was aware of was his irrepressible wit and spontaneity. Even today he is credited not only with having invented the late-night talk show (he originated the Tonight Show), but he's acknowledged as being the greatest ad-libber of all time. Irreverent, totally non-linear, he refused to take anything seriously.

Here's his delivery of an ad for Coldene Stick Chest Rub, whose teleprompter script was a straight pitch for avoiding the "greasy, gooey mess" of "ordinary greasy rubs."

Allen: "Say, do you smear your youngsters like this when they have a cold? Do they smear you right back? Gets pretty gooey, doesn't it? Well, friends, stick by those gooey kids of yours. They're the best friend your car ever had. But finally somebody has taken the grease and messiness out, and put grit and grime back in.
      Here's what I mean, and I wish I knew. It's called Coldene Stick Chest Rub, and you just stick it in your old rubbery chest.Watch how to avoid the messiness and discomfort of eating fried chicken with your bare hands. Your fingers never even touch it. That's right. The whole operation is handled by your toes...."

Allen sent me an autographed copy of his book, "How to be Funny; discovering the comic you," in which this and many other such items appear, a few years ago, after I had sent him a note letting him know how much he meant to me and millions of others of my generation. He also put me on his list to receive his frequent mailings of clippings on the many issues he felt were important -- underlined and asterisked.

Several months later I invited him to attend a film-and-video networking event here in Santa Fe called "Schmoozarama '96." He sent his regrets and best wishes in an open letter which began as follows:

"Having devoted a good part of my life to schmoozing and a not insignificant portion of my energies to ramming I am naturally not loathe - whatever that means - to participate in the general encouragement of whatever it is that you people are up to. On the general understanding that nothing you are doing is either illegal or immoral you may count me among your supporters..."

In the outpouring of articles and testimonials that followed Mr. Allen's death, many of his colleagues and friends spoke not only about his incredible wit and his extraordinary output as a Renaissance Man, but about his kindness and decency, his warmth and gentlemanliness.

As for his social concerns (his latest one being the rise of vulgarity in entertainment and media) he never stopped, and he was crusading in crisp, clear, erudite sentences right up to his last week.

A friend of his wrote that the two seminal experiences of Allen's life were the gratitude he felt at being treated to a cup of coffee and a hot dog when he was cold and homeless one night at age 16, and the tearful gratitude he felt when he found out that his wife, Jayne, did not have cancer after all. Allen, an agnostic, speculated that the earliest prayers of primitive man were probably prayers of gratitude.

With that deep sense of gratitude for a life well-lived and for a true role model and inspiration, I say thank you and goodbye, Steve. You'll never know what a difference you made.

Jim Terr is a singer-songwriter and humorist who lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico at www.JimTerr.com. Hear an interview with Steve Allen here.