Friday, October 31, 2008

[MISP] FW: Governor Richardson Announces Record Week for Film Production

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          For Immediate Release                                                       Contact: New Mexico Film Office

         October 31, 2008                                                                             505-476-5600                  

 

                                           

Governor Bill Richardson Announces Record Week for New Film Production in New Mexico

Friendship! Starts Filming in December

 

SANTA FE-Governor Bill Richardson today announced that the German feature film, Friendship!, will shoot in New Mexico making this a record week for film announcements. Earlier this week, Governor Richardson announced two feature films, The Spy Next Door and The Book of Eli, and the second season of the TV series In Plain Sight will soon start production in New Mexico.

 

"This caps a record week for film announcements in New Mexico and, more importantly, it means jobs and patronage for our businesses— all the more poignant in these challenging national economic times," Governor Richardson said. "When all is said and done, we expect these four projects to generate over $230 million in economic activity around the state.  Not bad for one week's announcements."

 

Already this year, 21 feature films, television series and made for TV movies have shot or announced plans to shoot in New Mexico and the film office is planning to announce additional projects soon. Since Governor Richardson took office in 2003, more than 110 major productions have shot in the state, creating more than $2 billion dollars in economic impact.

 

Friendship! is comedy by German production company Wiedemann & Berg. It stars German actors Matthias Schweighöfer and Friedrich Mücke and will film in and around Albuquerque from December 2 to January 20th. The production plans to hire approximately 60 local crew members and more than 325 actors, including principal and background talent.

 

Based on real life experiences by co-producer Tom Zickler, Friendship! tells the story of a young East German who in 1989 travels to San Francisco with his best friend to find his father who fled the communist country years earlier. It will be released in Germany in November 2009 for the 20th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall.

 

Markus Goller will direct, with Mark Popp serving as executive producer. Max Wiedemannn and Quirin Berg will produce.

 

##

 

 

 

Alarie Ray-Garcia

Deputy Communications Director

Office of the New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson

State Capitol, Suite 400

Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501

Office:505-476-2248

Cell:505-231-7350


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[MISP] The Book of Eli w/ Denzel Washington & Gary Oldman

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From the NM Business Weekly:

Denzel Washington to Shoot in NM 

A new film starring Denzel Washington and Gary Oldman will shoot in New Mexico starting in February, according to Gov. Bill Richardson.

"The Book of Eli" is an action thriller that takes place in the not-too-distant future, in a wasteland of what was once America. Washington is a lone warrior who must fight to bring society the knowledge contained in a book that could be key to its redemption.

Oldman will play Carnegie, the despot of a small town, who seeks the book that Washington's character is guarding, according to theHollywood Reporter.

The film will shoot in and around Alamogordo, Albuquerque, Carrizozo and Santa Fe from February through May. Plans include hiring about 250 local crew members.

The producers are Joel Silver, Andrew Kosove, Broderick Johnson and Denzel Washington. Brothers Albert and Allen Hughes will direct; they directed "From Hell," "Dead Presidents" and "Menace II Society."

Since implementing generous tax incentives in 2003, the state has attracted more than 110 major feature films and television series, bringing an economic impact of more than $2 billion, according to Richardson's office

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Wednesday, October 29, 2008

Re: [MISP] FW: Article from the Las Vegas Sun about St. John of Las Vegas

To answer your question Eric, Turquoise Trail Films currently is producing a slate of five Micro Budget films (under $1 million). Our business approach was not to pitch films, but was to pitch a business model for developing, producing and marketing these films with little risk and a potential for high return. We have locked in funding for the first slate. Other factors have delayed our project but we should be in production soon after the first of the year. We have a bond model that we are using to raise the funds (much like a zero coupon bond) that we intend to duplicate for financing of future slates and projects. I have found that trying raise funds in our great state is very difficult and you have much better luck selling your ideas outside of the state. Of course it is better that we bring funds into the state then watch them leave the state in one form or another. I understand that we are a small fish and that the state is trying to catch the big fish but in the long run it is the small fish that will be committed to staying in the pond and supporting its survival. 

On Oct 29, 2008, at 4:34 PM, Sam Levy, NET MAN wrote:

***This is a MISP Listserv message. Responses are sent to the list by default.*** ***For more info about MISP and the listserv, scroll to the bottom of the page*** * I was in conversation with a group of investors in Phoenix last week who are looking at almost the exact same model.

One important thing came up - is that these pooled investment groups are almost always interested in trying to get their productions bonded (with a film completion bond).

Film completion bonds are tricky and complicated instruments, and just like the below group, really don't work until a budget is in the $2 million + range... and of course there are conflicts and fears by the creative management about being bonded. But, the finance source wants this guarantee.

Not meant to be a wrinkle in the works, and slightly off from your question, but we were finding that just the concept of film completion bonds immediately set the investors, especially the larger investing partners at ease.

Film completion bonds are essentially handled by only 3 companies (IFG, cineFinance, Film Finances), and are a non-brokerable/commissionable product - the bond company works directly with the production. Bonds can take 4 to 6 weeks just to get a quote and offer. More info and links to those 3 bond companies I've put here: http://www.riograndeins.com/film-insurance.htm

Sam
Film Insurance Manager
Rio Grande Insurance

Eric Renz-Whitmore wrote:
From Ann and Carrie at the Albuquerque Film Office comes the following (from the Las Vegas Sun) about the financing for "Saint John of Las Vegas".

The idea of pooling money for a production fund comes up fairly often -- as does financing packages for slates of film.  Has anyone made any progress with this?

FILM: 
Vegas-set film financed in new way 
Wade Bradley is founder and chief executive of IndieVest, a Los Angeles-based company that matches its members relatively small investors and producers of independent films, using pools of the investors' money to finance the films. One of the company's projects, "Saint John of Las Vegas," starring Steve Buscemi, recently completed filming in New Mexico and Las Vegas.
By Jerry Fink 
Tue, Oct 28, 2008 (2 a.m.) 
"Saint John of Las Vegas" recently wrapped filming here, the latest of many independent films that have found their way to town in recent years.
Beyond the Sun
Indie icon Steve Buscemi portrays an ex-gambler who is lured back into the game by a veteran insurance-fraud investigator. Buscemi, known for roles in "Fargo," "The Big Lebowski" and "Reservoir Dogs," is no stranger to Las Vegas. He played a psycho killer in "Con Air," the 1997 movie in which a planeload of convicts crashes on the Strip.
What is unusual about "Saint John of Las Vegas" is the way the $3.8 million film is being financed by a pool of small-time investors.
It's the first film produced by Indie- 
Vest, a Los Angeles-based company that sells memberships to potential investors and matches them to projects. 
"There are companies that fund films. But we develop, produce, fund and guarantee theater distribution in up to 1,500 theaters." says IndieVest founder and Chief Executive Wade Bradley. "The IndieVest concept is similar to the management fee you pay if you join a hedge fund."
Potential investors join IndieVest for membership fees ranging from $20 to $4,900 the latter for an all-access membership that allows them to look at projects with top-tier talent already on board. "They decide whether they want to invest," Bradley says. The minimum investment in a film is $50,000.
"Saint John" is expected to be screened at the Sundance Film Festival in January and to be released next year. The key to the success of any film is distribution, and Bradley says IndieVest has distributors with all the major theater chains.
IndieVest has 20 projects in various stages of development, Bradley says, and the company plans to make four to six films over the next year. The productions' budgets will range from $3 million to $12 million.
"We're not blowing up planes, it's not nonstop action, although we can have a lot of action with the more modest budget," Bradley says. "What we are looking at are compelling stories, unique subjects, engaging character portrayals, films with a phenomenal script that attract top talent who want to play the role."
"Saint John of Las Vegas" fits that model. It's the directorial debut of Hue Rhodes, who also wrote the screenplay, a loose adaptation of Dante's "Inferno." The script attracted stars such as Buscemi, comedian Sarah Silverman, Peter Dinklage ("The Station Agent"), John Cho ("Harold & Kumar"), Tim Blake Nelson ("O Brother, Where Art Thou?") and Romany Malco ("The 40 Year Old Virgin").
Most of the film was shot in Albuquerque, which lured the company with lucrative tax breaks. But the final scenes were filmed in Vegas.
One of the investors is Nick Radkowsky, 26, an artist from New York City. He was drawn to IndieVest because it was an investment that promised a nice return from something that stirs his passion.
"I love film. It is a large part of my life," Radkowsky said during a phone interview. "I spent a lot of time with filmmakers from art school and watching them trying to get projects off the ground. A lot of issues of film financing are not covered in school."
Radkowsky is a successful commercial artist and designer who also does consulting with public relations firms. He considers himself a sophisticated investor with a diverse portfolio, but this is his first venture into film. He researched how films are funded before he took his leap into the investment pool.
"They're normally funded through private companies, large conglomerates like Universal or Disney," Radkowsky said. "It's like a clearinghouse situation. They produce tons of films and the successful ones subsidize the unsuccessful ones which leads to a lot of infighting. It's a Byzantine, very complicated system."
Radkowsky invested in hedge funds several years ago, putting his money into a pool that he had no control over. "Investors didn't know what projects they were investing in, which is fine," he says. "A lot of investments work that way. You trust your financial investor to pick the right investments."
But with IndieVest, Radkowsky knows what he's investing in. If he doesn't believe in the project, he doesn't invest. 
"To lose investment money in a credit default or something is one thing," he said. "There's a lot of difference in that and in investing in a film and being proud of what you created, regardless of the return on the investment.
"There's a certain joy in building something you can be proud of." 
IndieVest has hidden advantages, Radkowsky says, such as networking. 
"They don't advertise it but inherent in the structure is the connection you make to the film community," Radkowsky said. "I've met a few people and have worked on some projects that were unrelated to film."
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Re: [MISP] FW: Article from the Las Vegas Sun about St. John of Las Vegas

I was in conversation with a group of investors in Phoenix last week who are looking at almost the exact same model.

One important thing came up - is that these pooled investment groups are almost always interested in trying to get their productions bonded (with a film completion bond).

Film completion bonds are tricky and complicated instruments, and just like the below group, really don't work until a budget is in the $2 million + range... and of course there are conflicts and fears by the creative management about being bonded. But, the finance source wants this guarantee.

Not meant to be a wrinkle in the works, and slightly off from your question, but we were finding that just the concept of film completion bonds immediately set the investors, especially the larger investing partners at ease.

Film completion bonds are essentially handled by only 3 companies (IFG, cineFinance, Film Finances), and are a non-brokerable/commissionable product - the bond company works directly with the production. Bonds can take 4 to 6 weeks just to get a quote and offer. More info and links to those 3 bond companies I've put here: http://www.riograndeins.com/film-insurance.htm

Sam
Film Insurance Manager
Rio Grande Insurance

Eric Renz-Whitmore wrote:
From Ann and Carrie at the Albuquerque Film Office comes the following (from the Las Vegas Sun) about the financing for "Saint John of Las Vegas".

The idea of pooling money for a production fund comes up fairly often -- as does financing packages for slates of film.  Has anyone made any progress with this?

FILM: 
Vegas-set film financed in new way 
Wade Bradley is founder and chief executive of IndieVest, a Los Angeles-based company that matches its members relatively small investors and producers of independent films, using pools of the investors' money to finance the films. One of the company's projects, "Saint John of Las Vegas," starring Steve Buscemi, recently completed filming in New Mexico and Las Vegas.
By Jerry Fink 
Tue, Oct 28, 2008 (2 a.m.) 
"Saint John of Las Vegas" recently wrapped filming here, the latest of many independent films that have found their way to town in recent years.
Beyond the Sun
Indie icon Steve Buscemi portrays an ex-gambler who is lured back into the game by a veteran insurance-fraud investigator. Buscemi, known for roles in "Fargo," "The Big Lebowski" and "Reservoir Dogs," is no stranger to Las Vegas. He played a psycho killer in "Con Air," the 1997 movie in which a planeload of convicts crashes on the Strip.
What is unusual about "Saint John of Las Vegas" is the way the $3.8 million film is being financed by a pool of small-time investors.
It's the first film produced by Indie- 
Vest, a Los Angeles-based company that sells memberships to potential investors and matches them to projects. 
"There are companies that fund films. But we develop, produce, fund and guarantee theater distribution in up to 1,500 theaters." says IndieVest founder and Chief Executive Wade Bradley. "The IndieVest concept is similar to the management fee you pay if you join a hedge fund."
Potential investors join IndieVest for membership fees ranging from $20 to $4,900 the latter for an all-access membership that allows them to look at projects with top-tier talent already on board. "They decide whether they want to invest," Bradley says. The minimum investment in a film is $50,000.
"Saint John" is expected to be screened at the Sundance Film Festival in January and to be released next year. The key to the success of any film is distribution, and Bradley says IndieVest has distributors with all the major theater chains.
IndieVest has 20 projects in various stages of development, Bradley says, and the company plans to make four to six films over the next year. The productions' budgets will range from $3 million to $12 million.
"We're not blowing up planes, it's not nonstop action, although we can have a lot of action with the more modest budget," Bradley says. "What we are looking at are compelling stories, unique subjects, engaging character portrayals, films with a phenomenal script that attract top talent who want to play the role."
"Saint John of Las Vegas" fits that model. It's the directorial debut of Hue Rhodes, who also wrote the screenplay, a loose adaptation of Dante's "Inferno." The script attracted stars such as Buscemi, comedian Sarah Silverman, Peter Dinklage ("The Station Agent"), John Cho ("Harold & Kumar"), Tim Blake Nelson ("O Brother, Where Art Thou?") and Romany Malco ("The 40 Year Old Virgin").
Most of the film was shot in Albuquerque, which lured the company with lucrative tax breaks. But the final scenes were filmed in Vegas.
One of the investors is Nick Radkowsky, 26, an artist from New York City. He was drawn to IndieVest because it was an investment that promised a nice return from something that stirs his passion.
"I love film. It is a large part of my life," Radkowsky said during a phone interview. "I spent a lot of time with filmmakers from art school and watching them trying to get projects off the ground. A lot of issues of film financing are not covered in school."
Radkowsky is a successful commercial artist and designer who also does consulting with public relations firms. He considers himself a sophisticated investor with a diverse portfolio, but this is his first venture into film. He researched how films are funded before he took his leap into the investment pool.
"They're normally funded through private companies, large conglomerates like Universal or Disney," Radkowsky said. "It's like a clearinghouse situation. They produce tons of films and the successful ones subsidize the unsuccessful ones which leads to a lot of infighting. It's a Byzantine, very complicated system."
Radkowsky invested in hedge funds several years ago, putting his money into a pool that he had no control over. "Investors didn't know what projects they were investing in, which is fine," he says. "A lot of investments work that way. You trust your financial investor to pick the right investments."
But with IndieVest, Radkowsky knows what he's investing in. If he doesn't believe in the project, he doesn't invest. 
"To lose investment money in a credit default or something is one thing," he said. "There's a lot of difference in that and in investing in a film and being proud of what you created, regardless of the return on the investment.
"There's a certain joy in building something you can be proud of." 
IndieVest has hidden advantages, Radkowsky says, such as networking. 
"They don't advertise it but inherent in the structure is the connection you make to the film community," Radkowsky said. "I've met a few people and have worked on some projects that were unrelated to film."
LEAVING THE LIST /LIST INFO: To leave the list, please email us at: artslab@unm.edu For other list info, please visit: http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/web/media-industries-list-info Available in RSS: http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/feed/rss_v2_0_msgs.xml

--  Save money & improve insurance coverage. I'll shop 30+ companies for you http://www.RioGrandeIns.com auto, home, business, etc for NM, CA, AZ, UT --     FSBO - Info & Listings by locals for the Santa Fe Real Estate market                  http://www.ByOwnerSantaFe.com --   NET MAN, Inc. : Business Websites That Work! Consulting & Development                    http://www.TheNetCave.com --         Santa Fe Arts And Culture : Key To The City Different                 http://www.SantaFeArtsAndCulture.org -- A group of unicorns is called a blessing. 

[MISP] FW: Article from the Las Vegas Sun about St. John of Las Vegas

***This is a MISP Listserv message. Responses are sent to the list by default.*** ***For more info about MISP and the listserv, scroll to the bottom of the page*** *

From Ann and Carrie at the Albuquerque Film Office comes the following (from the Las Vegas Sun) about the financing for "Saint John of Las Vegas".

The idea of pooling money for a production fund comes up fairly often -- as does financing packages for slates of film.  Has anyone made any progress with this?

FILM: 
Vegas-set film financed in new way 
Wade Bradley is founder and chief executive of IndieVest, a Los Angeles-based company that matches its members relatively small investors and producers of independent films, using pools of the investors' money to finance the films. One of the company's projects, "Saint John of Las Vegas," starring Steve Buscemi, recently completed filming in New Mexico and Las Vegas.

By Jerry Fink 
Tue, Oct 28, 2008 (2 a.m.) 
"Saint John of Las Vegas" recently wrapped filming here, the latest of many independent films that have found their way to town in recent years.

Beyond the Sun
Indie icon Steve Buscemi portrays an ex-gambler who is lured back into the game by a veteran insurance-fraud investigator. Buscemi, known for roles in "Fargo," "The Big Lebowski" and "Reservoir Dogs," is no stranger to Las Vegas. He played a psycho killer in "Con Air," the 1997 movie in which a planeload of convicts crashes on the Strip.
What is unusual about "Saint John of Las Vegas" is the way the $3.8 million film is being financed by a pool of small-time investors.

It's the first film produced by Indie- 
Vest, a Los Angeles-based company that sells memberships to potential investors and matches them to projects. 
"There are companies that fund films. But we develop, produce, fund and guarantee theater distribution in up to 1,500 theaters." says IndieVest founder and Chief Executive Wade Bradley. "The IndieVest concept is similar to the management fee you pay if you join a hedge fund."

Potential investors join IndieVest for membership fees ranging from $20 to $4,900 the latter for an all-access membership that allows them to look at projects with top-tier talent already on board. "They decide whether they want to invest," Bradley says. The minimum investment in a film is $50,000.
"Saint John" is expected to be screened at the Sundance Film Festival in January and to be released next year. The key to the success of any film is distribution, and Bradley says IndieVest has distributors with all the major theater chains.
IndieVest has 20 projects in various stages of development, Bradley says, and the company plans to make four to six films over the next year. The productions' budgets will range from $3 million to $12 million.
"We're not blowing up planes, it's not nonstop action, although we can have a lot of action with the more modest budget," Bradley says. "What we are looking at are compelling stories, unique subjects, engaging character portrayals, films with a phenomenal script that attract top talent who want to play the role."
"Saint John of Las Vegas" fits that model. It's the directorial debut of Hue Rhodes, who also wrote the screenplay, a loose adaptation of Dante's "Inferno." The script attracted stars such as Buscemi, comedian Sarah Silverman, Peter Dinklage ("The Station Agent"), John Cho ("Harold & Kumar"), Tim Blake Nelson ("O Brother, Where Art Thou?") and Romany Malco ("The 40 Year Old Virgin").
Most of the film was shot in Albuquerque, which lured the company with lucrative tax breaks. But the final scenes were filmed in Vegas.
One of the investors is Nick Radkowsky, 26, an artist from New York City. He was drawn to IndieVest because it was an investment that promised a nice return from something that stirs his passion.
"I love film. It is a large part of my life," Radkowsky said during a phone interview. "I spent a lot of time with filmmakers from art school and watching them trying to get projects off the ground. A lot of issues of film financing are not covered in school."
Radkowsky is a successful commercial artist and designer who also does consulting with public relations firms. He considers himself a sophisticated investor with a diverse portfolio, but this is his first venture into film. He researched how films are funded before he took his leap into the investment pool.
"They're normally funded through private companies, large conglomerates like Universal or Disney," Radkowsky said. "It's like a clearinghouse situation. They produce tons of films and the successful ones subsidize the unsuccessful ones which leads to a lot of infighting. It's a Byzantine, very complicated system."
Radkowsky invested in hedge funds several years ago, putting his money into a pool that he had no control over. "Investors didn't know what projects they were investing in, which is fine," he says. "A lot of investments work that way. You trust your financial investor to pick the right investments."

But with IndieVest, Radkowsky knows what he's investing in. If he doesn't believe in the project, he doesn't invest. 
"To lose investment money in a credit default or something is one thing," he said. "There's a lot of difference in that and in investing in a film and being proud of what you created, regardless of the return on the investment.

"There's a certain joy in building something you can be proud of." 
IndieVest has hidden advantages, Radkowsky says, such as networking. 
"They don't advertise it but inherent in the structure is the connection you make to the film community," Radkowsky said. "I've met a few people and have worked on some projects that were unrelated to film."

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[MISP] Fwd: NY Times Incentives Article Response

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The NY Times on incentives a week or two back generated a great deal of response -- here are some thoughts from Albuquerque Studios' COO Nick Smerigan, who's been doing a good job of talking up production in NM himself (btw, another good reminder to complete the Film Office economic impact survey)... 

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/12/us/12incentives.html?_r=1&scp=4&sq=Tax%20Incentives%20New%20Mexico&st=cse&oref=slogin

United States Film Production Incentives

Over the past 4 to 5 years there has been a lot written and discussed in regards to the various tax incentives and rebate programs that many states have offered film and television productions to entice the productions to bring work to their states.  The tax incentives and rebates were, to the best of my knowledge, established to create jobs and act as an economic stimulus for the state.  To that end, most states have never been able to quantify whether the incentive packages that they offer are actually stimulating their economy or creating new jobs because, to date, there is no clear process by which to determine the impact of the dollars spent.  Whether quantifying dollars spent directly by the productions or the multiplying effect of those dollars within the local economy, it has been difficult to measure how that spending is extending into local communities.

The programs do, in fact, keep jobs and production in the U.S. . There's no question about that. But, important questions need to be answered. Are these rebates and incentive programs a rush to compete in the marketplace with little or no thought as to how they are administered or awarded? And, how do these programs ACTUALLY impact the state's economy?  In your article you mentioned how successful the New Mexico program has been.  One of the major factors in my decision to lend my expertise to a $90M+ infrastructure project in New Mexico was how the New Mexico Film Incentive Program was being executed and how knowledgeable the people are who make the decisions to extend the rebates to the productions. 

Many legislators, legal consultants and other political advisers use the argument that states are paying out millions of dollars to production companies and that expenditure does not equal the tax revenue the state is receiving in return.  First, how can a state rebate more than the production actually spends?  Isn't that impossible?  For example, with a 25% rebate in New Mexico , the local taxable spend is always guaranteed to be four times the rebated amount.  That spend not only generates sales or gross receipts taxes but also filters through the economy as it multiplies from salaries to home purchases to development and back to salaries, etc, etc.  Second, the focus should not solely be about state income tax receipts but about the benefit production activity and spending provide the populace of that state.  This is the "economic stimulus" that differentiates these rebate and incentive bills from the other economic development programs mentioned in your article.  The question then becomes, "How do we quantify how much the populace is benefiting from the local production generated by the programs?"  Shouldn't we focus on the fact that a particular production can inject many millions of dollars into the state economy in a timeframe much shorter than any other industry? Or, that many of the local production support personnel and companies in the state hired by the production would not have otherwise had that job or that business?  The production companies are going to make their project somewhere and, without an incentive, a local market has little to no chance of capturing that economic development opportunity.

Truly sustainable incentive programs should be determined by many reasonable factors including location (both look and proximity to the powerbases of Los Angeles and New York ), available local crew and access to equipment and services, to name a few.  An incentive program should not be based solely on one state's desire to outdo another.  Film and television production is in an intricate business with many moving parts. The people who pen these rebate and incentive programs not only need to understand how each piece of a proposed incentive will impact the local economy but must also understand the production industry and its processes. Each state is different and presents its own advantages and disadvantages to potential production clients. With the appropriate incentives on offer, a state can direct its approach in order to attract specific types and quantities of production.  Each incentive program should take this into account and states must craft their legislation to benefit their local economy by capitalizing on these differences.

Albuquerque Studios infused over $91 million of infrastructure into the local economy, without state or local investment, because the structure and administration of the New Mexico rebate program was attractive to our clients. New Mexico had an established production support and crew base and the location was close enough to Los Angeles to make it more attractive. The program is SUSTAINABLE as a result of how it is funded and the way each dollar spent is recycled time and time again through the economy.  This investment alone should prove that the right incentive packages work.  Glamour has always been Hollywood's calling card but the individuals who create that glamour are hard working people who have created a multi-billion dollar industry – an industry that has created an untold number of jobs and wealth across the world.  There should be no doubt that they are business men and women who look to manufacture their product in the most financially beneficial arena.  Why shouldn't they?  They provide jobs, in most cases high-paying union jobs, to local citizens no matter what their socioeconomic backround.  They use services and products from the various locales and put an incredible amount of money into the communities. And, yes, they do pay taxes in those areas.

It can get tiring hearing the same arguments from the same people over and over again.  The answer is simple. Without an incentive program there is virtually no chance that you would have attracted any of the production money spent thus far in your state (or any future production business).  Whether it is $1 million or $100 million, production spending benefited your local economy by its very nature.  If you want to quantify this impact then put together a method by which that can be done – don't just say that it isn't working. New Mexico is in the process of creating such a methodology right now.  While a certain incentive program may not be working because it is not crafted to take advantage of a state's particular set of economic and geographical conditions, a wisely crafted, sustainable program DOES work.  Films are now being made in America that historically would have been made in other countries, where Americans would not get an opportunity to work on them.  Whatever we do going forward, let's start by looking at simple business policies before we just throw a percentage on the table.  What is it you are trying to accomplish for your state and communities?  What are the benefits to your local work force?  How are the local businesses going to benefit and, most importantly, how do you measure the program's impact on your state's economy? 

If approached cautiously and intelligently, state-specific production incentive programs are successful. I came to the desert of New Mexico because I believed in the production incentive which provided a "competitive edge" for the Studio.  I stay in the desert because I believe that system is working and will continue to provide that "competitive edge" far into the future. 

 

Nick Smerigan

COO

Albuquerque Studios

Albuquerque , New Mexico




--
ARTS Lab's Experimental Music Series starts November 6th. More info at http://artslab.unm.edu

Eric Renz-Whitmore, Program Coordinator
ARTS Lab
MSC04 2570
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131
505-277-2253
http://artslab.unm.edu
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[MISP] Governor Richardson Announces In Plain Sight to Return to New Mexico for Season 2

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For Immediate Release                                                                     Contact: NM Film Office

October 29, 2008                                                                                              505.476.5600

                                                       

Governor Bill Richardson Announces In Plain Sight to return to New Mexico for Season 2

SANTA FE—Governor Bill Richardson today announced the Universal Network Television series, In Plain Sight, starring Mary McCormack and Fred Weller, will return to New Mexico to film for a second season.  The series airs on the USA Network.

In Plain Sight tells the story of a federal marshal, played by McCormack, who oversees a community of Witness Protection Program members.  Other cast members include Leslie Ann Warren, Nicole Hiltz, Todd Williams, Cristian de la Fuente and Paul Ben-Victor.

The production will consist of 16 episodes and will be shot in and around Albuquerque from October 2008 through May 4, 2009. They expect to hire approximately 175 local New Mexico crew members. 

 

Executive producers are David Maples and Paul Stupin, with Clara George producing.

 

Since Governor Richardson took office, over 100 feature films and television series have shot in the state, adding over $2 billion dollars to New Mexico's economy.

 

 

##

 

 

Alarie Ray-Garcia

Deputy Communications Director

Office of the New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson

State Capitol, Suite 400

Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501

Office:505-476-2248

Cell:505-231-7350

 

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Monday, October 27, 2008

[MISP] Governor Bill Richardson Announces The Spy Next Door to be filmed in New Mexico

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For Immediate Release                                                     Contact: New Mexico Film Office

October 27, 2008                                                                                            505-476-5600

                                                                                           

Governor Bill Richardson Announces The Spy Next Door to be filmed in New Mexico

 

SANTA FE—Governor Bill Richardson announced today that the action/comedy, The Spy Next Door, starring Jackie Chan, will be filmed in New Mexico.

 

The production will be shot in and around Albuquerque in November and December. They expect to hire approximately 150 local crew members and over 600 actors, including principal and background talent. 

 

Jackie Chan plays a man who is asked to baby-sit his neighbor's children and winds up having to protect them from secret agents after one the kids accidentally downloads a code. 

 

The film will be produced by Relativity Media and directed by Brian Levant (Are We There Yet?, Snow Dogs, The Flintstones, and Beethoven). 

 

Since Governor Richardson took office, over 100 major film and television projects have shot in the state, adding over $2 billion dollars in economic impact.

 

 

# # #

 

 

 

 

Caitlin Kelleher

Media Coordinator for Governor Bill Richardson

State Capitol, Suite 400

Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501

Office: 505-476-2299

Cell: 505-795-2480

 

 


Confidentiality Notice: This e-mail, including all attachments is for the sole use of the intended recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged information. Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is prohibited unless specifically provided under the New Mexico Inspection of Public Records Act. If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender and destroy all copies of this message. -- This email has been scanned by the Sybari - Antigen Email System.



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Thursday, October 23, 2008

[MISP] URGENT: ECONOMIC IMPACT SURVEY

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NM FILM/MEDIA INDUSTRY SURVEY

It's been mentioned on this list once or twice, but the NM Film Office survey for professionals working in the film and media industries is now in the field. If you have received this survey link (the email would have come from branchingmedia.com), please complete yours as soon as possible (it takes less than ten minutes).  If your primary source of income is work in film and digital media and you haven't received your survey, please double check your email or contact the NM Film Office at:

Main:   505-476-5600
email:  lisa@nmfilm.com
Web:   www.nmfilm.com

In these turbulent times, it's more essential than ever that the state legislature has an accurate assessment of the media industries' role in New Mexico's growth.  Please help the NM Film Office -- and the broader community -- by completing your survey today. 


--
ARTS Lab's Experimental Music Series starts November 6th. More info at http://artslab.unm.edu

Eric Renz-Whitmore, Program Coordinator
ARTS Lab
MSC04 2570
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131
505-277-2253
http://artslab.unm.edu
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Friday, October 17, 2008

Re: [MISP] NY Times Article & Win-win North & South

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***For more info about MISP and the listserv, scroll to the bottom of the page***
*

Very well stated Chris. United we stand!
Rick Clemente

Sent from my iPhone

On Oct 16, 2008, at 4:38 PM, Chris Meyer <chris@CYBMOTION.COM> wrote:

> ***This is a MISP Listserv message. Responses are sent to the list
> by default.***
> ***For more info about MISP and the listserv, scroll to the bottom
> of the page***
> *
>
> At 9:19 AM -0600 10/16/08, Larry N Stouffer wrote:
>
>> If above-the-line participants, including NM production companies,
>> are left out, when Hollywood runs off to other states there will be
>> little infrastructure to support below-the-line participants; our
>> so-called "NM Film Industry" will surely be left barren
>
> After motion08 (which turned out to be a _wonderful_ conference,
> BTW), I was having breakfast with a peer who is based out of
> Orlando. He discussed how Florida was ultimately unsuccessful in
> establishing a film industry. The reasons were many, including
> ultimately deciding to put their eggs in the theme park basket
> (witness Universal Studios Orlando has been morphing into just a
> theme park attraction rather than a production studio), the failure
> to establish a local post/above the line industry, and the lack of
> infrastructure (banks etc. who financed the making and distribution
> of mainstream movies). Without elements such as the last two,
> Florida ultimately just became a filming _location_, not the home of
> a film _industry_.
>
> It has indeed proven lucrative so far for NM to become a "Hollywood
> backlot", and we have a lot to hold our heads high about (and a lot
> of below the line people have good jobs, and their union has a good
> membership). But is the ultimate goal to be a location, or to have
> an industry?
>
>> IATSE plays an important role in this attempted development, but
>> it, in and of itself, is weak and cannot support itself.
>
> I think it's a bit out of bounds to bash IATSE, especially (as Jon
> rightly points out) as they have indeed done a lot of the heavy
> lifting so far, and have become a political force. Jon is right that
> if other niches inside the NM film industry want a piece of the pie,
> then they have to roll up their sleeves and start rolling dough,
> rather than just sit at the table impatiently with fork in hand
> (smile).
>
>> Above and Below, not one or the other, is the formula for success.
>
> I agree with that. As well as the need to look beyond our individual
> needs, to what is good for the overall health of the industry. A lot
> of people are understandably focused on how they get their own film
> funded, how they get more members for their union, how they get work
> for their studio, how they build up their own school's program, etc.
> But if you really want to see the industry take off, everyone is
> better off looking at what the industry needs, not _just_ what they
> individually need (or even worse, competing with each other).
>
> A rising river floats all boats...
>
> - Chris
>
>
> --
> _______
> \ Trish & Chris Meyer/CyberMotion: Motion Graphics Design & Effects
> \ books & videos: http://books.cybmotion.com
> \ projects: http://projects.cybmotion.com
> \ articles: http://articles.cybmotion.com
> \______________________________________________________________
>
> LEAVING THE LIST /LIST INFO:
> To leave the list, please email us at: artslab@unm.edu
> For other list info, please visit: http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/web/media-industries-list-info
> Available in RSS: http://groups.google.com/group/nm-media-industries/feed/rss_v2_0_msgs.xml

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Re: [MISP] Gene Grant Tonight and this weekend...

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All Sideshow Bob with coke bottle glasses all the time, my hero!
 
Nice piece, Gene and great NM exposure.
 
We're lucky to be free to cast our votes, but unfortunate to not know whether they actually count in any meaningful way.
 
s

On Fri, Oct 17, 2008 at 5:30 PM, Eric Renz-Whitmore <ewhitmore@gmail.com> wrote:
***MISP-EVENTS-L is an announcement only listserv*** *
Lots of stuff going on this weekend, but a quick update on the PBS News Hour's visit to New Mexico and KNME -- including a report from Gene Grant on tonight's show... (like in minutes)

From Gene:

If you can't watch in real time, or are receiving this over the weekend, no worries. It'll be on their website www.pbs.org/newshour as well as my writing in their "Reporters Notebook" section.
That's not all the good news. Below is a review of a short play I wrote (and is being staged now) for the Vortex Theatre play festival called, "Electoral Dysfunctions." There's eight plays in all. My play is called "Enter On The Execution."

For more info on the earlier shows, visit:


--
NMITSA is now accepting nominations for the fourth annual Tech Excellence Awards.  More info at http://www.nmitsa.org/

Eric Renz-Whitmore, Program Coordinator
ARTS Lab
MSC04 2570
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131
505-277-2253
http://artslab.unm.edu
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[MISP] Friends of Film Meeting on Sunday, 10/19

If you would like to, please join the Friends of Film, Video & Arts on Sunday, Oct. 19th, 3 to 6 p.m. at the Harwood Center (7th and Mountain in Albuquerque, basement on north side of building).
 
Featuring:

"Monetizing Your Content" by Kenneth Knoll 

"The opportunities to monetize video content are rapidly increasing. Your ability to realize various revenue sources is key to surviving in a competitive industry. Presenter will provide a multiple of examples currently in practice by his company. Audience participants will also be asked  to provide examples to share with the group."

3:00 - 3:30    Social time, networking

3:30 - 3:45    Announcements

3:45 - 5:00    Program, Q&A

5:00 - 6:00    Show our work, give feedback

Meeting is free to FoFVA members, guests are asked to donate $10.  Please bring refreshments to share. 





[MISP] Alvin Curran at the ARTS Lab



Subject: Alvin Curran Residency next week
Date: October 17, 2008 10:06:26 AM MDT
Reply-To:   CFA_ADMIN-L@unm.edu

Dear colleagues,

I would like to draw your attention to the residency next week of renowned composer and performer Alvin Curran. Alvin has been our guest before and I believe his work as an artist has the kind of range that will likely be of interest to all disciplines within the college. His talk on Monday October 20--part of the composition area's monthly "Composers Night"-- is at the Artslab lecture hall 6:00 PM and I have attached other activities during the residency including being my guest on "Other Voices, Other Sounds," a new music radio show I host on KUNM--that's this Sunday at 9:00 PM. He will also be speaking for IFDM in a class taught by Nick Flor at the Anderson School (Monday-Wednesday 9-10:30 AM) in ASM 1017. Seating is likely limited for that as is his appearance in a master class with UNM composition students on Tuesday at 11:00 AM in FAC 1108. Please be sure to pass this information along to students who might be interested. Thanks go to the Department of Music and College of Fine Arts for their financial support. And special thanks to Jack Ox for her efforts in bringing Alvin Curran back to UNM.

Hope to see some of you at one (or more) of these events!

chris

Christopher Shultis, Ph.D.
Regents' Professor of Music
University of New Mexico
MSC04 2570 Center for the Arts
Albuquerque, NM 87131
PH:(505) 277-4449
FAX: (505) 277-0708

Note: Please use chris.shultis@gmail.com address for all non-UNM business related matters as well as  for any correspondence regarded as private rather than public. Thanks! cs

Thursday, October 16, 2008

Re: [MISP] NY Times Article & Win-win North & South

***This is a MISP Listserv message. Responses are sent to the list by default.***
***For more info about MISP and the listserv, scroll to the bottom of the page***
*

At 9:19 AM -0600 10/16/08, Larry N Stouffer wrote:

>If above-the-line participants, including NM production companies,
>are left out, when Hollywood runs off to other states there will be
>little infrastructure to support below-the-line participants; our
>so-called "NM Film Industry" will surely be left barren

After motion08 (which turned out to be a _wonderful_ conference,
BTW), I was having breakfast with a peer who is based out of Orlando.
He discussed how Florida was ultimately unsuccessful in establishing
a film industry. The reasons were many, including ultimately deciding
to put their eggs in the theme park basket (witness Universal Studios
Orlando has been morphing into just a theme park attraction rather
than a production studio), the failure to establish a local
post/above the line industry, and the lack of infrastructure (banks
etc. who financed the making and distribution of mainstream movies).
Without elements such as the last two, Florida ultimately just became
a filming _location_, not the home of a film _industry_.

It has indeed proven lucrative so far for NM to become a "Hollywood
backlot", and we have a lot to hold our heads high about (and a lot
of below the line people have good jobs, and their union has a good
membership). But is the ultimate goal to be a location, or to have an
industry?

>IATSE plays an important role in this attempted development, but it,
>in and of itself, is weak and cannot support itself.

I think it's a bit out of bounds to bash IATSE, especially (as Jon
rightly points out) as they have indeed done a lot of the heavy
lifting so far, and have become a political force. Jon is right that
if other niches inside the NM film industry want a piece of the pie,
then they have to roll up their sleeves and start rolling dough,
rather than just sit at the table impatiently with fork in hand
(smile).

>Above and Below, not one or the other, is the formula for success.

I agree with that. As well as the need to look beyond our individual
needs, to what is good for the overall health of the industry. A lot
of people are understandably focused on how they get their own film
funded, how they get more members for their union, how they get work
for their studio, how they build up their own school's program, etc.
But if you really want to see the industry take off, everyone is
better off looking at what the industry needs, not _just_ what they
individually need (or even worse, competing with each other).

A rising river floats all boats...

- Chris


--
_______
\ Trish & Chris Meyer/CyberMotion: Motion Graphics Design & Effects
\ books & videos: http://books.cybmotion.com
\ projects: http://projects.cybmotion.com
\ articles: http://articles.cybmotion.com
\______________________________________________________________

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